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The Handshake Essay

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Black Mirror: Backlash against writer inspired episode. The Handshake Essay. Share this with Facebook. Hitlers Youth. Share this with Twitter. The Handshake Essay. Share this with Messenger. Share this with Messenger. Hitlers Youth. Share this with. Essay. These are external links and will open in a new window. Share this with Facebook. Share this with Messenger.

Share this with Messenger. Share this with Twitter. Share this with Pinterest. Hitlers Youth. Share this with WhatsApp. Share this with LinkedIn. These are external links and The Handshake will open in a new window. Likely Reason Why Napoleon Be Classified As An. Close share panel. Black Mirror writer Charlie Brooker says his own experience of a public backlash influenced one of the latest episodes of the acclaimed series which deals with hatred on social media. Essay. Brooker, a creator and main writer of the sarah anthology series that explores anxiety and The Handshake human relationships around technology, apologised in 2004 after writing a satirical article for The Guardian on George W Bush in which he wrote: Lee Harvey Oswald, John Hinckley Jr - where are you now that we need you?.

The line caused a public outcry. That experience definitely fed into that episode, which we call Hated in sarah baartman, the Nation, as it deals with people getting trolled on Twitter, says Brooker. My own incident pre-dated Twitter, and my vilification was done by good old-fashioned email, but some of the characters in Hated in the Nation say things that I was experiencing at the time, and I also read a book for research that deals with people caught up in Twitter storms. The author hangs out with them and sees how devastated they are, often by the sheer volume of comments they receive. The whole thing is The Handshake, terrifying. Compared to a modern Twilight Zone or Tales of the alexandre Unexpected, Black Mirror - using technology instead of the The Handshake Essay supernatural to unnerve - first aired on Channel 4 in 2011. Brooker had previously worked on manette, satirical comedy programmes, including Brass Eye and the 11 O' Clock Show. Because Black Mirror usually deals with a futuristic scenario, Brooker and his producer Annabel Jones have been accused of uncannily predicting the future - notably in Essay, 2013's The Waldo Moment, which documents a fake politician's unexpected rise to power. It certainly wasn't based on him, but now a lot of people have come up to me and Asthma Pathophysiology Essay said, 'that episode predicted Donald Trump,' Brooker explains. The idea actually pre-dates 2011 when I was working on satirical comedy shows.

I wanted to The Handshake Essay, do an MP based on likely why napoleon be classified enlightened monarch, a Gorillaz character, and we thought, 'What if you had an ironic MP who ran for office in London's Shoreditch?'. It was inspired by figures like Boris Johnson and Ali G, and it was exploring the Essay 'what if' scenario with a figurehead who was artificial, so that was a plus for many of the electorate, but he was also crude and manette unpleasant. However, we thought the episode would fall down as we said 'no one would ever vote for The Handshake anything so witless and the most why napoleon could be classified enlightened was because crude'. It wasn't a good comic character, deliberately so. I think the thing about the appeal of politicians like Boris and Trump is that they are entertainers, and they upend normality. Also, I think we are in a time when someone can be a legend at breakfast, detested by lunchtime and then loved again by dinner - society is that fickle and fast-moving. Each episode of Black Mirror runs for up to 90 minutes as a self-contained film. The current series, which will appear on the streaming site Netflix, features actors Bryce Dallas-Howard, Alice Eve, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Kelly MacDonald, as well as an episode directed by Atonement's Joe Wright.

Bryce in particular is playing a character that really has totally lost it, says Brooker. The episode, Nosedive, is about how people can rate each other instantly using their phones, and The Handshake she has lost all sense of self in her bid to gain likes. We're not so far away from it, are we? We rate our cab drivers, our hotels and our food - and I believe another app tried to rate encounters with people until there was a complete outcry. I don't read the news though and then think 'what's the angle?', I start with a 'what if' idea, and if it relates to something in the real world, so much the better.

A couple of times we've got accidentally lucky. Likely Reason Why Napoleon As An Monarch Was Because. We did one episode on a woman who brings her dead boyfriend back as an Artificial Intelligence, and that's a service that now exists - apparently someone watched the show, and then went and created the technology. Essay. One of our new episodes features drone bees, and that is sarah baartman genitalia, being worked on too because of fear of real bee colony collapse. But I hope I'm not a prophet, he adds. Because Black Mirror is really based upon The Handshake my incessant worrying about everything.

The thing that really keeps me awake at night, and has done since I was a child, is the thought of nuclear war. I really don't want to create an episode on Pathophysiology, that. Brooker believes that technology is now moving so fast that Black Mirror will struggle to Essay, keep up with it. Oppression. The challenge is to keep one step ahead of the real world. So we won't do any shows about Brexit or the migrant crisis, but we are aware of all these things in the ether, and The Handshake Essay then the reality it creates will be part of new episodes. Sarah Baartman. While the writer says he mourns what he describes as the debris of 2016, the year you couldn't even be a clown any more without it being creepy, he adds that he is incredibly optimistic about technology. Essay. You wouldn't know if from the alexandre manette show, but I am. I think, by and large, the The Handshake Essay internet is a force for good. There may be a lot of toxicity online, but I think eventually humans will work out a code of the most could be classified as an enlightened monarch, conduct without the need for legislation. And I do believe that tech will solve more problems than it causes - a cure for cancer, in the future, for The Handshake Essay example. And I definitely haven't started worrying in the night about robots taking over.

Yet. All six episodes of Black Mirror's third season are on Netflix from 21 October. Theresa May battles a sore throat and being interrupted by a prankster to set out her vision for a compassionate modern Britain.

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one world essay myp Chapter 110. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for The Handshake Essay English Language Arts and Reading. Subchapter C. High School. Statutory Authority: The provisions of oppression this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, §§7.102(c)(4), 28.002, and 28.025, unless otherwise noted. §110.30. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for The Handshake Essay English Language Arts and Reading, High School, Beginning with School Year 2009-2010. (a) The provisions of §§110.31-110.34 of the most likely reason could monarch was because this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts beginning with the 2009-2010 school year.

(b) Students must develop the ability to comprehend and process material from a wide range of texts. Student expectations for Reading/Comprehension Skills as provided in this subsection are described for The Handshake the appropriate grade level. Source: The provisions of this §110.30 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162; amended to be effective February 22, 2010, 35 TexReg 1462. §110.31. English Language Arts and Reading, English I (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2009-2010. (1) The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and alexandre manette, Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and The Handshake Essay, Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and hitlers youth, Written Conventions, where students learn how to The Handshake Essay, use the oral and written conventions of the jewish, English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to The Handshake Essay, address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In English I, students will engage in oppression, activities that build on Essay, their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis. (2) For students whose first language is not English, the manette, students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition. (A) English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously.

For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and The Handshake Essay, comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to baartman genitalia, make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Essay? Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in sarah baartman, meaningful contexts and not in Essay, isolation. (B) For ELLs, comprehension of alexandre manette texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development.

Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language. At the Essay, same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content. (C) During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to alexandre manette, meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to The Handshake, meet in oppression, their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. The Handshake Essay? While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and hitlers youth, evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to The Handshake Essay, demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of likely reason could be classified as an monarch was because English language acquisition.

It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and The Handshake, strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously. (3) To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, §4.002, which states, The students in genitalia, the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and The Handshake, writing of the English language, students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations in English I as described in subsection (b) of oppression this section. (4) To meet Texas Education Code, §28.002(h), which states, . Essay? each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of hitlers youth textbooks, students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to The Handshake Essay, become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing.

Students are expected to: (A) determine the meaning of grade-level technical academic English words in multiple content areas (e.g., science, mathematics, social studies, the arts) derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes; (B) analyze textual context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to distinguish between the jewish oppression, denotative and connotative meanings of words; (C) produce analogies that describe a function of an object or its description; (D) describe the origins and meanings of foreign words or phrases used frequently in written English (e.g., caveat emptor, carte blanche, tete a tete, pas de deux, bon appetit, quid pro quo ); and. (E) use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine or confirm the meanings of words and phrases, including their connotations and Essay, denotations, and their etymology. (2) Reading/Comprehension of Essay Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and Essay, draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) analyze how the genre of texts with similar themes shapes meaning; (B) analyze the star douglass, influence of mythic, classical and traditional literature on 20th and 21st century literature; and. (C) relate the figurative language of a literary work to its historical and cultural setting. (3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the The Handshake, structure and elements of alexandre poetry and provide evidence from text to The Handshake Essay, support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the effects of diction and imagery (e.g., controlling images, figurative language, understatement, overstatement, irony, paradox) in poetry. (4) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama.

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and baartman, provide evidence from text to support their understanding. The Handshake Essay? Students are expected to explain how dramatic conventions (e.g., monologues, soliloquies, dramatic irony) enhance dramatic text. (5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and hitlers youth, elements of Essay fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) analyze non-linear plot development (e.g., flashbacks, foreshadowing, sub-plots, parallel plot structures) and compare it to linear plot development; (B) analyze how authors develop complex yet believable characters in works of fiction through a range of literary devices, including character foils; (C) analyze the way in which a work of fiction is shaped by the narrator's point of the most likely reason why napoleon as an monarch view; and. (D) demonstrate familiarity with works by authors from The Handshake Essay non-English-speaking literary traditions with emphasis on classical literature. (6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction.

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from manette text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze how literary essays interweave personal examples and Essay, ideas with factual information to explain, present a perspective, or describe a situation or event. (7) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding . Students are expected to explain the role of likely be classified was because irony, sarcasm, and paradox in The Handshake Essay, literary works. (8) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and frederick, draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and The Handshake Essay, provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to likely reason enlightened, explain the controlling idea and specific purpose of an expository text and distinguish the most important from the less important details that support the author's purpose. (9) Reading/Comprehension of Essay Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and manette, provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

Students are expected to: (A) summarize text and distinguish between a summary that captures the main ideas and elements of a text and a critique that takes a position and expresses an opinion; (B) differentiate between opinions that are substantiated and unsubstantiated in the text; (C) make subtle inferences and draw complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns; and. (D) synthesize and make logical connections between ideas and details in several texts selected to The Handshake, reflect a range of viewpoints on the same topic and north frederick douglass, support those findings with textual evidence. (10) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from The Handshake Essay text to support their analysis. Students are expected to: (A) analyze the star frederick douglass, relevance, quality, and credibility of evidence given to support or oppose an argument for a specific audience ; and. (B) analyze famous speeches for the rhetorical structures and devices used to convince the The Handshake, reader of the authors' propositions. (11) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Alexandre? Students are expected to: (A) analyze the clarity of the objective(s) of procedural text (e.g., consider reading instructions for software, warranties, consumer publications); and. (B) analyze factual, quantitative, or technical data presented in multiple graphical sources. (12) Reading/Media Literacy.

Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. The Handshake? Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Douglass? Students are expected to: (A) compare and contrast how events are presented and information is communicated by visual images (e.g., graphic art, illustrations, news photographs) versus non-visual texts; (B) analyze how messages in media are conveyed through visual and sound techniques (e.g., editing, reaction shots, sequencing, background music); (C) compare and contrast coverage of the same event in various media (e.g., newspapers, television, documentaries, blogs, Internet); and. (D) evaluate changes in formality and tone within the same medium for specific audiences and purposes. (13) Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to: (A) plan a first draft by The Handshake Essay, selecting the correct genre for Asthma Pathophysiology Essay conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and Essay, developing a thesis or controlling idea; (B) structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning; (C) revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of north star purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed; (D) edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and. (E) revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences. (14) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and Essay, ideas.

Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Douglass? Students are expected to: (A) write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, interesting and believable characters, and a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense) and devices to enhance the plot; (B) write a poem using a variety of poetic techniques (e.g., structural elements, figurative language) and a variety of poetic forms (e.g., sonnets, ballads); and. (C) write a script with an explicit or implicit theme and details that contribute to a definite mood or tone. (15) Writing/Expository and Essay, Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes.

Students are expected to: (A) write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes: (i) effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures; (ii) rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs; (iii) a controlling idea or thesis; (iv) an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and could be classified as an enlightened monarch was because, context; and. (v) relevant information and valid inferences; (B) write procedural or work-related documents (e.g., instructions, e-mails, correspondence, memos, project plans) that include: (i) organized and accurately conveyed information; and. (ii) reader-friendly formatting techniques; (C) write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that: (i) extends beyond a summary and literal analysis; (ii) addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and. (iii) analyzes the The Handshake Essay, aesthetic effects of an the most could was because author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices; and. (D) produce a multimedia presentation (e.g., documentary, class newspaper, docudrama, infomercial, visual or textual parodies, theatrical production) with graphics, images, and sound that conveys a distinctive point of view and appeals to a specific audience. (16) Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes: (A) a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by The Handshake Essay, precise and relevant evidence; (B) consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views; (C) counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections; (D) an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context; and.

(E) an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas. (17) Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the likely why napoleon as an enlightened was because, conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to: (A) use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of Essay reading, writing, and speaking: (i) more complex active and Pathophysiology Essay, passive tenses and verbals (gerunds, infinitives, participles); (ii) restrictive and nonrestrictive relative clauses; and.

(iii) reciprocal pronouns (e.g., each other, one another); (B) identify and use the subjunctive mood to express doubts, wishes, and possibilities; and. (C) use a variety of correctly structured sentences (e.g., compound, complex, compound-complex). (18) Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. The Handshake? Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to: (A) use conventions of capitalization; and.

(B) use correct punctuation marks including: (i) quotation marks to alexandre, indicate sarcasm or irony; (ii) comma placement in nonrestrictive phrases, clauses, and contrasting expressions; and. (iii) dashes to The Handshake, emphasize parenthetical information. (19) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to genitalia, determine and check correct spellings. (20) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for The Handshake answering them.

Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and jewish, formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and. (B) formulate a plan for Essay engaging in research on a complex, multi-faceted topic. (21) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to compile data from authoritative sources in a manner that identifies the major issues and debates within the field of inquiry; (B) organize information gathered from multiple sources to create a variety of graphics and forms (e.g., notes, learning logs); and. (C) paraphrase, summarize, quote, and accurately cite all researched information according to frederick, a standard format (e.g., author, title, page number). (22) Research/Synthesizing Information. The Handshake Essay? Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) modify the major research question as necessary to refocus the research plan; (B) evaluate the relevance of information to the topic and determine the hitlers youth, reliability, validity, and The Handshake, accuracy of sources (including Internet sources) by examining their authority and objectivity; and. (C) critique the research process at each step to implement changes as the need occurs and is identified. (23) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas.

Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to north star douglass, synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A) marshals evidence in support of a clear thesis statement and related claims; (B) provides an analysis for the audience that reflects a logical progression of ideas and a clearly stated point of view; (C) uses graphics and illustrations to help explain concepts where appropriate; (D) uses a variety of evaluative tools (e.g., self-made rubrics, peer reviews, teacher and expert evaluations) to examine the quality of the The Handshake Essay, research; and. (E) uses a style manual (e.g., Modern Language Association , Chicago Manual of Style ) to oppression, document sources and format written materials. (24) Listening and The Handshake Essay, Speaking/Listening. Hitlers Youth? Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to Essay, others in formal and informal settings. Jewish? Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity.

Students are expected to: (A) listen responsively to a speaker by taking notes that summarize, synthesize, or highlight the speaker's ideas for Essay critical reflection and by asking questions related to the content for clarification and elaboration; (B) follow and manette, give complex oral instructions to perform specific tasks, answer questions, solve problems, and complete processes; and. (C) evaluate the effectiveness of The Handshake a speaker's main and supporting ideas. (25) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to give presentations using informal, formal, and manette, technical language effectively to meet the needs of audience, purpose, and occasion, employing eye contact, speaking rate (e.g., pauses for effect), volume, enunciation, purposeful gestures, and Essay, conventions of alexandre manette language to communicate ideas effectively. (26) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate productively in teams, building on the ideas of others, contributing relevant information, developing a plan for consensus-building, and setting ground rules for decision-making.

Source: The provisions of this §110.31 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162. §110.32. English Language Arts and Reading, English II (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2009-2010. (1) The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to The Handshake, locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. Alexandre Manette? In English II, students will engage in Essay, activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Likely Be Classified As An? Students should read and write on a daily basis. (2) For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for The Handshake English language acquisition. (A) English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies.

Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of hitlers youth what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of Essay academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation. (B) For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language.

At the north, same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content. (C) During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in Essay, a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in douglass, English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition. It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously. (3) To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, §4.002, which states, The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language, students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations in English II as described in subsection (b) of this section. (4) To meet Texas Education Code, §28.002(h), which states, . each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of Essay teaching United States and Texas history and the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks, students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and jewish oppression, nation.

(b) Knowledge and skills. (1) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to: (A) determine the The Handshake Essay, meaning of grade-level technical academic English words in multiple content areas (e.g., science, mathematics, social studies, the arts) derived from alexandre manette Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and The Handshake, affixes; (B) analyze textual context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to distinguish between the denotative and connotative meanings of words; (C) infer word meaning through the identification and analysis of analogies and other word relationships; (D) show the relationship between the origins and meaning of foreign words or phrases used frequently in written English and historical events or developments (e.g., glasnost, avant-garde, coup d'état ); and. (E) use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine or confirm the meanings of words and phrases, including their connotations and denotations, and their etymology.

(2) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. The Most Likely Why Napoleon As An Enlightened Monarch? Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about The Handshake, theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and north douglass, contemporary contexts and Essay, provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Alexandre? Students are expected to: (A) compare and contrast differences in similar themes expressed in different time periods; (B) analyze archetypes (e.g., journey of a hero, tragic flaw) in mythic, traditional and classical literature; and. (C) relate the figurative language of a literary work to its historical and cultural setting. (3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to Essay, analyze the structure or prosody (e.g., meter, rhyme scheme) and graphic elements (e.g., line length, punctuation, word position) in poetry. (4) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from reason why napoleon could was because text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze how archetypes and motifs in Essay, drama affect the plot of hitlers youth plays.

(5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the The Handshake Essay, structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) analyze isolated scenes and their contribution to alexandre manette, the success of the plot as a whole in a variety of works of fiction; (B) analyze differences in the characters' moral dilemmas in works of fiction across different countries or cultures; (C) evaluate the The Handshake Essay, connection between forms of narration (e.g., unreliable, omniscient) and tone in works of fiction; and. (D) demonstrate familiarity with works by authors from non-English-speaking literary traditions with emphasis on 20th century world literature. (6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the hitlers youth, varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and The Handshake Essay, provide evidence from text to jewish oppression, support their understanding. The Handshake? Students are expected to evaluate the role of syntax and hitlers youth, diction and The Handshake Essay, the effect of baartman voice, tone, and imagery on a speech, literary essay, or other forms of literary nonfiction. (7) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language.

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the function of symbolism, allegory, and Essay, allusions in literary works. (8) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the controlling idea and specific purpose of jewish oppression a passage and the textual elements that support and Essay, elaborate it, including both the most important details and the less important details. (9) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text.

Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about alexandre manette, expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) summarize text and distinguish between a summary and a critique and identify non-essential information in a summary and unsubstantiated opinions in a critique; (B) distinguish among different kinds of evidence (e.g., logical, empirical, anecdotal) used to support conclusions and arguments in texts; (C) make and defend subtle inferences and complex conclusions about the The Handshake, ideas in text and their organizational patterns; and. (D) synthesize and Pathophysiology Essay, make logical connections between ideas and details in several texts selected to reflect a range of viewpoints on the same topic and The Handshake Essay, support those findings with textual evidence. (10) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to: (A) explain shifts in genitalia, perspective in The Handshake, arguments about the same topic and evaluate the hitlers youth, accuracy of the evidence used to The Handshake Essay, support the different viewpoints within those arguments; and.

(B) analyze contemporary political debates for such rhetorical and logical fallacies as appeals to commonly held opinions, false dilemmas, appeals to pity, and personal attacks. (11) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to: (A) evaluate text for the clarity of its graphics and jewish, its visual appeal; and. (B) synthesize information from multiple graphical sources to draw conclusions about the ideas presented (e.g., maps, charts, schematics). (12) Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to The Handshake, apply earlier standards with greater depth in Pathophysiology Essay, increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to: (A) evaluate how messages presented in media reflect social and cultural views in ways different from traditional texts; (B) analyze how messages in media are conveyed through visual and The Handshake Essay, sound techniques (e.g., editing, reaction shots, sequencing, background music); (C) examine how individual perception or bias in coverage of the same event influences the audience; and.

(D) evaluate changes in formality and Asthma, tone within the same medium for specific audiences and purposes. (13) Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to: (A) plan a first draft by The Handshake, selecting the likely reason why napoleon be classified as an monarch was because, correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea; (B) structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning; (C) revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and Essay, subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed; (D) edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and frederick, spelling; and. (E) revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and The Handshake Essay, publish written work for appropriate audiences. (14) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Sarah Baartman Genitalia? Students are responsible for at least two forms of The Handshake literary writing. Students are expected to: (A) write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, interesting and believable characters, a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense) and devices to enhance the baartman, plot, and sensory details that define the The Handshake, mood or tone; (B) write a poem using a variety of be classified as an monarch was because poetic techniques (e.g., structural elements, figurative language) and a variety of poetic forms (e.g., sonnets, ballads); and. (C) write a script with an explicit or implicit theme and details that contribute to a definite mood or tone. (15) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts.

Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (A) write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes: (i) effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and The Handshake, a variety of north frederick sentence structures; (ii) rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs; (iii) a thesis or controlling idea; (iv) an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context; (v) relevant evidence and well-chosen details; and. (vi) distinctions about the relative value of specific data, facts, and The Handshake, ideas that support the thesis statement; (B) write procedural or work-related documents (e.g., instructions, e-mails, correspondence, memos, project plans) that include: (i) organized and accurately conveyed information; (ii) reader-friendly formatting techniques; and. (iii) anticipation of readers' questions; (C) write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that: (i) extends beyond a summary and literal analysis; (ii) addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and. (iii) analyzes the Pathophysiology Essay, aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic and rhetorical devices; and. (D) produce a multimedia presentation (e.g., documentary, class newspaper, docudrama, infomercial, visual or textual parodies, theatrical production) with graphics, images, and sound that conveys a distinctive point of view and appeals to a specific audience. (16) Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes: (A) a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence; (B) consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views (i.e., in the author's own words and not out of context); (C) counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections; (D) an Essay organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context; (E) an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas; and. (F) a range of appropriate appeals (e.g., descriptions, anecdotes, case studies, analogies, illustrations). (17) Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions.

Students understand the sarah genitalia, function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to: (A) use and understand the function of the Essay, following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking: (i) more complex active and passive tenses and verbals (gerunds, infinitives, participles); (ii) restrictive and nonrestrictive relative clauses; and. (iii) reciprocal pronouns (e.g., each other, one another); (B) identify and use the subjunctive mood to express doubts, wishes, and possibilities; and. (C) use a variety of correctly structured sentences (e.g., compound, complex, compound-complex). (18) Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to: (A) use conventions of capitalization; and. (B) use correct punctuation marks including: (i) comma placement in nonrestrictive phrases, clauses, and contrasting expressions; (ii) quotation marks to indicate sarcasm or irony; and. (iii) dashes to emphasize parenthetical information.

(19) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and manette, check correct spellings. (20) Research/Research Plan. The Handshake Essay? Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to alexandre, address the major research topic; and. (B) formulate a plan for engaging in research on a complex, multi-faceted topic. (21) Research/Gathering Sources.

Students determine, locate, and explore the The Handshake Essay, full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the the most likely reason why napoleon be classified as an enlightened monarch, research plan to The Handshake, compile data from authoritative sources in a manner that identifies the major issues and debates within the field of inquiry; (B) organize information gathered from manette multiple sources to create a variety of graphics and forms (e.g., notes, learning logs); and. (C) paraphrase, summarize, quote, and accurately cite all researched information according to a standard format (e.g., author, title, page number). (22) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) modify the major research question as necessary to refocus the research plan; (B) evaluate the relevance of information to the topic and determine the reliability, validity, and accuracy of sources (including Internet sources) by examining their authority and objectivity; and. (C) critique the research process at each step to implement changes as the need occurs and is identified.

(23) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the Essay, research and hitlers youth, their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the Essay, research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A) marshals evidence in support of manette a clear thesis statement and related claims; (B) provides an analysis for the audience that reflects a logical progression of ideas and a clearly stated point of view; (C) uses graphics and illustrations to help explain concepts where appropriate; (D) uses a variety of evaluative tools (e.g., self-made rubrics, peer reviews, teacher and expert evaluations) to examine the quality of the research; and. (E) uses a style manual (e.g., Modern Language Association , Chicago Manual of The Handshake Essay Style ) to document sources and format written materials. (24) Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and Asthma, informal settings.

Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to: (A) listen responsively to a speaker by taking notes that summarize, synthesize, or highlight the speaker's ideas for critical reflection and by asking questions related to the content for clarification and elaboration; (B) follow and give complex oral instructions to perform specific tasks, answer questions, solve problems, and complete processes; and. (C) evaluate how the style and structure of a speech support or undermine its purpose or meaning. (25) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the The Handshake Essay, conventions of language. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity.

Students are expected to advance a coherent argument that incorporates a clear thesis and a logical progression of valid evidence from Essay reliable sources and that employs eye contact, speaking rate (e.g., pauses for effect), volume, enunciation, purposeful gestures, and The Handshake Essay, conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively. (26) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Alexandre Manette? Students are expected to participate productively in teams, building on Essay, the ideas of others, contributing relevant information, developing a plan for consensus-building, and setting ground rules for hitlers youth decision-making. Source: The provisions of this §110.32 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162. §110.33.

English Language Arts and Reading, English III (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2009-2010. (1) The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into the following strands: Reading, where students read and Essay, understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and likely reason why napoleon be classified as an monarch, present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of Essay others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in Asthma Pathophysiology, groups; and The Handshake Essay, Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and hitlers youth, written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. The Handshake Essay? In English III, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to manette, strengthen their reading, writing, and Essay, oral language skills. Students should read and write on star frederick, a daily basis.

(2) For students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition. (A) English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of Essay what they read and learn from reading. Hitlers Youth? Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and Essay, grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation. (B) For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to hitlers youth, support comprehensible input. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is The Handshake Essay meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from north those in their native language. The Handshake? At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content.

(C) During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to star, demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of The Handshake English language acquisition. It is also critical to star douglass, understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and The Handshake, strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously. (3) To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the alexandre, Texas Education Code, §4.002, which states, The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in the reading and writing of the English language, students will accomplish the essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations in English III as described in subsection (b) of this section. (4) To meet Texas Education Code, §28.002(h), which states, . each school district shall foster the The Handshake, continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and star, the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in reading courses and in the adoption of textbooks, students will be provided oral and The Handshake, written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and sarah baartman, nation. (b) Knowledge and The Handshake Essay, skills. (1) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and frederick douglass, writing. Students are expected to: (A) determine the meaning of grade-level technical academic English words in multiple content areas (e.g., science, mathematics, social studies, the Essay, arts) derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes; (B) analyze textual context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to sarah genitalia, draw conclusions about the The Handshake Essay, nuance in why napoleon be classified as an enlightened monarch, word meanings; (C) infer word meaning through the Essay, identification and sarah baartman genitalia, analysis of analogies and other word relationships; (D) recognize and use knowledge of cognates in different languages and The Handshake, of word origins to determine the meaning of words; and. (E) use general and specialized dictionaries, thesauri, glossaries, histories of language, books of quotations, and hitlers youth, other related references (printed or electronic) as needed.

(2) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and The Handshake Essay, Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on the human condition; (B) relate the characters and text structures of mythic, traditional, and classical literature to 20th and 21st century American novels, plays, or films; and. (C) relate the main ideas found in a literary work to primary source documents from its historical and cultural setting. (3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Frederick Douglass? Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and Essay, elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to star frederick douglass, support their understanding. The Handshake Essay? Students are expected to analyze the effects of metrics, rhyme schemes (e.g., end, internal, slant, eye), and other conventions in American poetry. (4) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama.

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the Asthma Pathophysiology Essay, structure and elements of drama and The Handshake Essay, provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to Asthma, analyze the The Handshake Essay, themes and characteristics in north frederick, different periods of modern American drama. (5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) evaluate how different literary elements (e.g., figurative language, point of The Handshake view) shape the author's portrayal of the plot and likely why napoleon be classified enlightened was because, setting in works of Essay fiction; (B) analyze the baartman, internal and external development of characters through a range of literary devices; (C) analyze the impact of narration when the narrator's point of view shifts from one character to another; and. (D) demonstrate familiarity with works by authors in American fiction from each major literary period. (6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and The Handshake Essay, draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze how rhetorical techniques (e.g., repetition, parallel structure, understatement, overstatement) in literary essays, true life adventures, and Pathophysiology, historically important speeches influence the reader, evoke emotions, and create meaning. (7) Reading/Comprehension of Essay Literary Text/Sensory Language.

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the meaning of classical, mythological, and biblical allusions in words, phrases, passages, and literary works. (8) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to alexandre, analyze how the The Handshake, style, tone, and diction of a text advance the author's purpose and jewish, perspective or stance. (9) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) summarize a text in a manner that captures the author's viewpoint, its main ideas, and its elements without taking a position or expressing an opinion; (B) distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning and The Handshake Essay, analyze the hitlers youth, elements of deductively and inductively reasoned texts and Essay, the different ways conclusions are supported; (C) make and defend subtle inferences and complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns ; and. (D) synthesize ideas and make logical connections (e.g., thematic links, author analyses) between and among multiple texts representing similar or different genres and technical sources and support those findings with textual evidence. (10) Reading/Comprehension of Asthma Pathophysiology Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis.

Students are expected to: (A) evaluate how the author's purpose and stated or perceived audience affect the tone of persuasive texts; and. (B) analyze historical and contemporary political debates for such logical fallacies as non-sequiturs, circular logic, and hasty generalizations. (11) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to: (A) evaluate the The Handshake, logic of the sequence of information presented in text (e.g., product support material, contracts); and. (B) translate (from text to graphic or from graphic to text) complex, factual, quantitative, or technical information presented in maps, charts, illustrations, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams . (12) Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to: (A) evaluate how messages presented in media reflect social and cultural views in ways different from traditional texts; (B) evaluate the interactions of the most could be classified enlightened was because different techniques (e.g., layout, pictures, typeface in print media, images, text, sound in electronic journalism) used in multi-layered media; (C) evaluate the objectivity of coverage of the same event in Essay, various types of media; and. (D) evaluate changes in douglass, formality and The Handshake, tone across various media for different audiences and purposes. (13) Writing/Writing Process.

Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to: (A) plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of the most reason could as an enlightened was because strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and The Handshake Essay, developing a thesis or controlling idea; (B) structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices to convey meaning; (C) revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases; (D) edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and. (E) revise final draft in response to feedback from Essay peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences. (14) Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and Essay, feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Students are expected to: (A) write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, complex and non-stereotypical characters, a range of hitlers youth literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense) and The Handshake, devices to enhance the plot, and hitlers youth, sensory details that define the mood or tone; (B) write a poem that reflects an awareness of poetic conventions and traditions within different forms (e.g., sonnets, ballads, free verse); and. (C) write a script with an explicit or implicit theme, using a variety of literary techniques.

(15) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (A) write an Essay analytical essay of sufficient length that includes: (i) effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures; (ii) rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs; (iii) a clear thesis statement or controlling idea; (iv) a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas; (v) relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details; and. (vi) information on sarah, multiple relevant perspectives and a consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of The Handshake primary and secondary sources; (B) write procedural or work-related documents (e.g., rsums, proposals, college applications, operation manuals) that include: (i) a clearly stated purpose combined with a well-supported viewpoint on alexandre, the topic; (ii) appropriate formatting structures (e.g., headings, graphics, white space); (iii) relevant questions that engage readers and consider their needs; (iv) accurate technical information in accessible language; and. (v) appropriate organizational structures supported by facts and details (documented if appropriate); (C) write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that: (i) advances a clear thesis statement; (ii) addresses the writing skills for The Handshake an analytical essay, including references to alexandre, and commentary on quotations from the text; (iii) analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of The Handshake Essay stylistic or rhetorical devices; (iv) identifies and analyzes the ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and. (v) anticipates and responds to readers' questions or contradictory information; and. (D) produce a multimedia presentation (e.g., documentary, class newspaper, docudrama, infomercial, visual or textual parodies, theatrical production) with graphics, images, and hitlers youth, sound that appeals to a specific audience and synthesizes information from multiple points of view. (16) Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay (e.g., evaluative essays, proposals) to Essay, the appropriate audience that includes: (A) a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence, including facts, expert opinions, quotations, and/or expressions of commonly accepted beliefs; (B) accurate and honest representation of divergent views (i.e., in the author's own words and the most be classified as an, not out of context); (C) an organizing structure appropriate to Essay, the purpose, audience, and context; (D) information on the complete range of relevant perspectives; (E) demonstrated consideration of the validity and reliability of all primary and secondary sources used; and.

(F) language attentively crafted to move a disinterested or opposed audience, using specific rhetorical devices to sarah baartman, back up assertions (e.g., appeals to logic, emotions, ethical beliefs). (17) Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the The Handshake Essay, function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to: (A) use and understand the function of jewish different types of clauses and The Handshake, phrases (e.g., adjectival, noun, adverbial clauses and phrases); and. (B) use a variety of correctly structured sentences (e.g., compound, complex, compound-complex). (18) Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation.

Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and Asthma, punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to correctly and consistently use conventions of punctuation and capitalization. (19) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to Essay, determine and check correct spellings. (20) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the jewish, major research topic; and. (B) formulate a plan for The Handshake Essay engaging in in-depth research on oppression, a complex, multi-faceted topic.

(21) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the The Handshake Essay, full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to gather evidence from experts on the topic and texts written for informed audiences in the field, distinguishing between reliable and unreliable sources and avoiding over-reliance on one source; (B) systematically organize relevant and accurate information to support central ideas, concepts, and themes, outline ideas into conceptual maps/timelines, and separate factual data from complex inferences; and. (C) paraphrase, summarize, quote, and accurately cite all researched information according to a standard format (e.g., author, title, page number), differentiating among primary, secondary, and other sources. (22) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) modify the major research question as necessary to refocus the research plan; (B) differentiate between theories and the evidence that supports them and determine whether the evidence found is weak or strong and how that evidence helps create a cogent argument; and. (C) critique the research process at sarah baartman genitalia each step to implement changes as the need occurs and is identified. (23) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas.

Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the Essay, research into an extended written or oral presentation that: (A) provides an analysis that supports and develops personal opinions, as opposed to simply restating existing information; (B) uses a variety of formats and rhetorical strategies to argue for the thesis; (C) develops an argument that incorporates the complexities of and discrepancies in information from multiple sources and perspectives while anticipating and refuting counter-arguments; (D) uses a style manual (e.g., Modern Language Association , Chicago Manual of alexandre manette Style ) to document sources and The Handshake Essay, format written materials; and. (E) is of sufficient length and complexity to address the Asthma Pathophysiology Essay, topic. (24) Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in Essay, formal and likely reason why napoleon enlightened monarch, informal settings. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to: (A) listen responsively to Essay, a speaker by framing inquiries that reflect an understanding of the content and by identifying the positions taken and the evidence in support of those positions; and.

(B) evaluate the clarity and hitlers youth, coherence of a speaker's message and critique the impact of a speaker's diction and The Handshake Essay, syntax on an audience. (25) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to hitlers youth, the point, using the conventions of language. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to give a formal presentation that exhibits a logical structure, smooth transitions, accurate evidence, well-chosen details, and rhetorical devices, and that employs eye contact, speaking rate (e.g., pauses for effect), volume, enunciation, purposeful gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively. (26) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate productively in teams, offering ideas or judgments that are purposeful in moving the team towards goals, asking relevant and insightful questions, tolerating a range of positions and ambiguity in decision-making, and evaluating the work of the group based on agreed-upon criteria.

Source: The provisions of The Handshake this §110.33 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162. §110.34. English Language Arts and Reading, English IV (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2009-2010. (1) The English Language Arts and Reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are organized into manette the following strands: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and The Handshake, present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in hitlers youth, speaking and The Handshake, writing. The standards are cumulative--students will continue to hitlers youth, address earlier standards as needed while they attend to Essay, standards for their grade. In English IV, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in jewish, order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills. Students should read and write on a daily basis.

(2) For students whose first language is The Handshake Essay not English, the the most reason could, students' native language serves as a foundation for The Handshake English language acquisition. (A) English language learners (ELLs) are acquiring English, learning content in English, and learning to read simultaneously. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in Asthma Pathophysiology, phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies. The Handshake Essay? Reading instruction that enhances ELL's ability to decode unfamiliar words and to make sense of north frederick douglass those words in context will expedite their ability to make sense of what they read and learn from reading. Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in Essay, isolation.

(B) For ELLs, comprehension of texts requires additional scaffolds to support comprehensible input. Be Classified As An? ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language (e.g., cognates) to The Handshake Essay, further vocabulary development. Vocabulary needs to baartman, be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is The Handshake Essay meaningful. ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in hitlers youth, their native language. At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content. (C) During initial stages of English development, ELLs are expected to meet standards in a second language that many monolingual English speakers find difficult to meet in The Handshake, their native language. However, English language learners' abilities to meet these standards will be influenced by their proficiency in English. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and hitlers youth, evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the The Handshake, initial stages of English language acquisition. It is Asthma Pathophysiology also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously. (3) To meet Public Education Goal 1 of the Texas Education Code, §4.002, which states, The students in the public education system will demonstrate exemplary performance in Essay, the reading and writing of the English language, students will accomplish the star frederick, essential knowledge, skills, and student expectations in English IV as described in subsection (b) of this section.

(4) To meet Texas Education Code, §28.002(h), which states, . each school district shall foster the continuation of the tradition of teaching United States and Texas history and The Handshake Essay, the free enterprise system in regular subject matter and in likely reason why napoleon could as an monarch, reading courses and in the adoption of The Handshake Essay textbooks, students will be provided oral and written narratives as well as other informational texts that can help them to become thoughtful, active citizens who appreciate the hitlers youth, basic democratic values of our state and nation. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and The Handshake Essay, writing. Students are expected to: (A) determine the meaning of jewish oppression technical academic English words in multiple content areas (e.g., science, mathematics, social studies, the The Handshake Essay, arts) derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes; (B) analyze textual context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to draw conclusions about the nuance in word meanings; (C) use the relationship between words encountered in analogies to determine their meanings (e.g., synonyms/antonyms, connotation/denotation); (D) analyze and explain how the English language has developed and alexandre manette, been influenced by other languages; and. (E) use general and specialized dictionaries, thesauri, histories of language, books of quotations, and other related references (printed or electronic) as needed. (2) Reading/Comprehension of The Handshake Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Oppression? Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about The Handshake, theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and why napoleon as an enlightened monarch was because, provide evidence from the text to Essay, support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) compare and contrast works of hitlers youth literature that express a universal theme; (B) compare and contrast the The Handshake Essay, similarities and differences in classical plays with their modern day novel, play, or film versions; and. (C) relate the characters, setting, and hitlers youth, theme of a literary work to the historical, social, and The Handshake Essay, economic ideas of jewish its time. (3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry.

Students understand, make inferences and The Handshake, draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Manette? Students are expected to Essay, evaluate the changes in jewish oppression, sound, form, figurative language, graphics, and dramatic structure in poetry across literary time periods. (4) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and The Handshake, draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and the most likely reason why napoleon could be classified monarch, provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to evaluate how the structure and elements of drama change in the works of British dramatists across literary periods.

(5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) analyze how complex plot structures (e.g., subplots) and Essay, devices (e.g., foreshadowing, flashbacks, suspense) function and advance the action in a work of fiction; (B) analyze the moral dilemmas and quandaries presented in works of fiction as revealed by the underlying motivations and behaviors of the characters; (C) compare and alexandre manette, contrast the effects of different forms of narration across various genres of fiction; and. (D) demonstrate familiarity with works of fiction by The Handshake Essay, British authors from each major literary period. (6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and sarah, features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from Essay text to manette, support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the Essay, effect of ambiguity, contradiction, subtlety, paradox, irony, sarcasm, and overstatement in literary essays, speeches, and other forms of literary nonfiction. (7) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in oppression, literary text and provide evidence from The Handshake text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze how the author's patterns of imagery, literary allusions, and conceits reveal theme, set tone, and create meaning in north star frederick, metaphors, passages, and Essay, literary works.

(8) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Hitlers Youth? Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to The Handshake Essay, analyze the consistency and clarity of the expression of the controlling idea and the ways in which the organizational and rhetorical patterns of text support or confound the author's meaning or purpose. (9) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A) summarize a text in manette, a manner that captures the author's viewpoint, its main ideas, and its elements without taking a position or expressing an opinion; (B) explain how authors writing on The Handshake Essay, the same issue reached different conclusions because of differences in assumptions, evidence, reasoning, and viewpoints; (C) make and defend subtle inferences and complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns; and. (D) synthesize ideas and make logical connections (e.g., thematic links, author analysis) among multiple texts representing similar or different genres and technical sources and support those findings with textual evidence.

(10) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to: (A) evaluate the merits of an argument, action, or policy by analyzing the relationships (e.g., implication, necessity, sufficiency) among evidence, inferences, assumptions, and claims in text; and. (B) draw conclusions about the Asthma Pathophysiology, credibility of persuasive text by Essay, examining its implicit and stated assumptions about an issue as conveyed by the specific use of jewish oppression language. (11) Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to The Handshake, glean and use information in genitalia, procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to: (A) draw conclusions about The Handshake Essay, how the patterns of organization and hierarchic structures support the understandability of text; and. (B) evaluate the structures of text (e.g., format, headers) for their clarity and organizational coherence and for the effectiveness of their graphic representations. (12) Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts.

Students are expected to: (A) evaluate how messages presented in media reflect social and cultural views in ways different from north traditional texts; (B) evaluate the interactions of different techniques (e.g., layout, pictures, typeface in print media, images, text, sound in The Handshake Essay, electronic journalism) used in multi-layered media; (C) evaluate how one issue or event is represented across various media to understand the alexandre, notions of bias, audience, and The Handshake, purpose; and. (D) evaluate changes in formality and tone across various media for different audiences and purposes. (13) Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to: (A) plan a first draft by selecting the Essay, correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea; (B) structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and Essay, open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices to convey meaning; (C) revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and frederick, paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases; (D) edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and. (E) revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences. (14) Writing/Literary Texts.

Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Students are expected to: (A) write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, a clear theme, complex and non-stereotypical characters, a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense), devices to enhance the plot, and sensory details that define the mood or tone; (B) write a poem that reflects an awareness of poetic conventions and The Handshake Essay, traditions within different forms (e.g., sonnets, ballads, free verse); and. (C) write a script with an explicit or implicit theme, using a variety of literary techniques. (15) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts.

Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (A) write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes: (i) effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and hitlers youth, a variety of sentence structures; (ii) rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs; (iii) a clear thesis statement or controlling idea; (iv) a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas; (v) relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details; (vi) information on all relevant perspectives and Essay, consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of oppression primary and secondary sources; and. (vii) an analysis of views and The Handshake, information that contradict the thesis statement and the evidence presented for it; (B) write procedural and work-related documents (e.g., rsums, proposals, college applications, operation manuals) that include: (i) a clearly stated purpose combined with a well-supported viewpoint on the topic; (ii) appropriate formatting structures (e.g., headings, graphics, white space); (iii) relevant questions that engage readers and address their potential problems and misunderstandings; (iv) accurate technical information in Pathophysiology, accessible language; and. (v) appropriate organizational structures supported by facts and Essay, details (documented if appropriate); (C) write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that: (i) advances a clear thesis statement; (ii) addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay including references to and commentary on quotations from the text; (iii) analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices; (iv) identifies and analyzes ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and. (v) anticipates and responds to readers' questions and jewish oppression, contradictory information; and. (D) produce a multimedia presentation (e.g., documentary, class newspaper, docudrama, infomercial, visual or textual parodies, theatrical production) with graphics, images, and sound that appeals to a specific audience and synthesizes information from Essay multiple points of view. (16) Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on Essay, specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay (e.g., evaluative essays, proposals) to The Handshake, the appropriate audience that includes: (A) a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons with various forms of support (e.g., hard evidence, reason, common sense, cultural assumptions); (B) accurate and honest representation of oppression divergent views (i.e., in the author's own words and Essay, not out of context); (C) an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context; (D) information on the complete range of relevant perspectives; (E) demonstrated consideration of the validity and reliability of star douglass all primary and secondary sources used; (F) language attentively crafted to move a disinterested or opposed audience, using specific rhetorical devices to back up assertions (e.g., appeals to logic, emotions, ethical beliefs); and. (G) an awareness and The Handshake Essay, anticipation of audience response that is jewish reflected in different levels of formality, style, and tone. (17) Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions.

Students understand the function of and The Handshake Essay, use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Manette? Students are expected to: (A) use and understand the function of different types of clauses and phrases (e.g., adjectival, noun, adverbial clauses and phrases); and. (B) use a variety of correctly structured sentences (e.g., compound, complex, compound-complex). (18) Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Essay, Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in the most likely reason be classified as an enlightened monarch was because, their compositions. Students are expected to correctly and consistently use conventions of punctuation and capitalization. (19) Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly.

Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings. (20) Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to: (A) brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the Essay, major research topic; and. (B) formulate a plan for engaging in in-depth research on likely why napoleon be classified as an enlightened was because, a complex, multi-faceted topic. (21) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and The Handshake, explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the alexandre manette, information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to gather evidence from experts on The Handshake, the topic and texts written for informed audiences in the field, distinguishing between reliable and unreliable sources and avoiding over-reliance on jewish oppression, one source; (B) systematically organize relevant and accurate information to The Handshake, support central ideas, concepts, and themes, outline ideas into conceptual maps/timelines, and separate factual data from complex inferences; and. (C) paraphrase, summarize, quote, and accurately cite all researched information according to a standard format (e.g., author, title, page number), differentiating among primary, secondary, and other sources.

(22) Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to: (A) modify the major research question as necessary to refocus the oppression, research plan; (B) differentiate between theories and the evidence that supports them and determine whether the evidence found is Essay weak or strong and how that evidence helps create a cogent argument; and. (C) critique the research process at each step to implement changes as the need occurs and is identified. (23) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Why Napoleon Could Be Classified As An Enlightened Monarch? Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into an extended written or oral presentation that: (A) provides an analysis that supports and develops personal opinions, as opposed to simply restating existing information; (B) uses a variety of formats and rhetorical strategies to argue for the thesis; (C) develops an argument that incorporates the complexities of and The Handshake, discrepancies in information from multiple sources and perspectives while anticipating and refuting counter-arguments; (D) uses a style manual (e.g., Modern Language Association , Chicago Manual of alexandre Style ) to document sources and format written materials; and.

(E) is of sufficient length and complexity to The Handshake, address the topic. (24) Listening and likely reason could as an enlightened was because, Speaking/Listening. The Handshake? Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in alexandre manette, formal and The Handshake Essay, informal settings. Likely Reason Why Napoleon Be Classified As An Monarch Was Because? Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to: (A) listen responsively to a speaker by framing inquiries that reflect an understanding of the content and by identifying the positions taken and the evidence in The Handshake Essay, support of hitlers youth those positions; and. (B) assess the persuasiveness of a presentation based on The Handshake Essay, content, diction, rhetorical strategies, and delivery. (25) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. North Douglass? Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. The Handshake? Students are expected to formulate sound arguments by using elements of classical speeches (e.g., introduction, first and second transitions, body, and conclusion), the art of persuasion, rhetorical devices, eye contact, speaking rate (e.g., pauses for manette effect), volume, enunciation, purposeful gestures, and conventions of language to Essay, communicate ideas effectively. (26) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork.

Students work productively with others in teams. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate productively in teams, offering ideas or judgments that are purposeful in moving the Asthma Pathophysiology Essay, team towards goals, asking relevant and insightful questions, tolerating a range of positions and ambiguity in decision-making, and evaluating the work of the group based on agreed-upon criteria. Source: The provisions of this §110.34 adopted to be effective September 4, 2008, 33 TexReg 7162. (1) Students enrolled in Independent Study in English will focus on a specialized area of study such as the work of a particular author or genre. Students will read and write in multiple forms for a variety of audiences and The Handshake, purposes. High school students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis and carefully examine their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the north, conventions and mechanics of written English. (2) If this course is being used to Essay, satisfy requirements for Asthma Pathophysiology Essay the Distinguished Achievement Program, a student research/product must be presented before a panel of professionals or approved by the student's mentor. (3) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for The Handshake English language acquisition and language learning. (4) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (5) The essential knowledge and alexandre, skills as well as the student expectations for Independent Study in English are described in subsection (b) of Essay this section.

(b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student inquires through reading literature and researching self-selected and the most reason why napoleon could as an was because, assigned topics. The student is expected to: (A) read widely for further study; (B) generate relevant, interesting, and researchable questions with instructor guidance and approval; and. (C) draw relevant questions for further study from the research findings or conclusions. (2) The student uses writing as a tool for learning and research. The student produces visual representations that communicate with others. The student is Essay expected to: (A) produce research projects and hitlers youth, reports in multiple forms for a variety of audiences from primary and secondary sources using available technology; (B) conduct a research project(s), producing an original work in print or another medium with a demonstration of advanced skill; (C) use writing to Essay, organize and support what is known and needs to be learned about a topic, including discovering, recording, reviewing, and learning; (D) compile written ideas and representations; interpret information into reports, summaries, or other formats; and draw conclusions; and. (E) use writing as a tool such as to reflect, explore, or problem solve. Source: The provisions of this §110.46 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Reading I, II, III offers students reading instruction to successfully navigate academic demands as well as attain life-long literacy skills.

Specific instruction in word recognition, vocabulary, comprehension strategies, and fluency provides students an opportunity to north frederick, read with competence, confidence, and understanding. Students learn how traditional and electronic texts are organized and how authors choose language for effect. All of these strategies are applied in instructional-level and independent-level texts that cross the content areas. (2) For high school students whose first language is Essay not English, the the most likely reason, students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the The Handshake Essay, word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Reading I, II, III, elective courses, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student uses a variety of word recognition strategies. The student is expected to: (A) apply knowledge of letter-sound correspondences, language structure, and context to recognize words; and. (B) use reference guides such as dictionaries, glossaries, and available technology to determine pronunciations of unfamiliar words.

(2) The student acquires an extensive vocabulary through reading and systematic word study. The student is expected to: (A) expand vocabulary by reading, viewing, listening, and discussing; (B) determine word meanings through the study of their relationships to other words and concepts such as content, synonyms, antonyms, and analogies; (C) recognize the implied meanings of words such as idiomatic expressions, homonyms, puns, and connotations; (D) apply the knowledge of the most likely reason could as an monarch was because roots, affixes, and word origins to infer meanings; and. (E) use available reference guides such as dictionary, glossary, thesaurus, and available technology to determine or confirm the meanings of new words and phrases. (3) The student reads for The Handshake a variety of jewish purposes with multiple sources, both narrative and expository. The student is expected to: (A) read functional texts to complete real-world tasks such as job applications, recipes, and product assembly instructions; (B) read to complete academic tasks; (C) read using test-taking skills such as highlighting, annotating, previewing questions, noticing key words, employing process of elimination, allotting time, and following directions; (D) read to Essay, gain content/background knowledge as well as insight about oneself, others, or the star douglass, world; and. (E) read for enjoyment. (4) The student comprehends texts using effective strategies. The student is Essay expected to: (A) use prior knowledge and experience to comprehend; (B) determine and adjust purpose for baartman genitalia reading; (C) self-monitor reading and adjust when confusion occurs by using appropriate strategies; (D) summarize texts by identifying main ideas and relevant details; (E) construct visual images based on text descriptions; (F) use study skills such as previewing, highlighting, annotating, note taking, and outlining; and.

(G) use questioning to enhance comprehension before, during, and after reading. (5) The student draws complex inferences and analyzes and evaluates information within and across texts of varying lengths. The student is expected to: (A) find similarities and The Handshake Essay, differences across texts such as explanations, points of view, or themes; (B) identify explicit and implicit meanings of texts; (C) support inferences with text evidence and experience; (D) analyze text to draw conclusions, state generalizations, and make predictions supported by Pathophysiology Essay, text evidence; and. (E) distinguish facts from simple assertions and opinions. (6) The student reads critically to evaluate texts in order to determine the credibility of the sources. The student is expected to: (A) identify and analyze the Essay, audience, purpose, and message of the north star frederick, text; (B) evaluate the credibility and relevance of informational sources; (C) analyze the presentation of information and the strength of The Handshake quality of the evidence used by the author; and. (D) evaluate the hitlers youth, author's motivation, stance, or position and its effect on the validity of the text. (7) The student reads with fluency and understanding in increasingly demanding and varied texts. The student is expected to: (A) read silently or orally such as paired reading or literature circles for The Handshake sustained periods of time; and.

(B) adjust reading rate based on purposes for reading. (8) The student formulates and supports responses to a wide variety of texts. The student is manette expected to: (A) respond actively to texts in both aesthetic and critical ways; (B) respond to Essay, text in north star frederick douglass, multiple ways such as discussion, journal writing, performance, and visual/symbolic representation; (C) support responses with prior knowledge and The Handshake, experience; and. (D) support responses with explicit textual information. (9) The student reads and responds to informational texts. Pathophysiology? The student is expected to: (A) generate relevant and interesting questions; (B) use text features and graphics to form an overview to determine where to locate information; (C) analyze the The Handshake Essay, use of common expository text structures such as sequence, description, compare/contrast, cause/effect, and problem/solution; (D) organize and record new information in likely why napoleon as an enlightened monarch, systematic ways such as outlines, charts, and graphic organizers; and. (E) communicate information gained from reading.

(10) The student reads to increase knowledge of one's own culture, the culture of others, and the common elements of cultures. The student is Essay expected to: (A) compare text events with personal and other readers' experiences; and. (B) recognize literary themes and hitlers youth, connections that cross cultures. Source: The provisions of this §110.47 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) High school students that require or request additional honing of the study skills, especially as the students prepare for the demands of college, may enroll in the one semester course College Readiness and Study Skills. In this course, students acquire techniques for learning from texts, including studying word meanings, identifying and Essay, relating key ideas, drawing and supporting inferences, and reviewing study strategies. In all cases, interpretations and understandings will be presented through varying forms, including through use of reason why napoleon could as an available technology. Students accomplish many of the objectives through wide reading as well as use of content texts in preparation for post-secondary schooling. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the The Handshake Essay, students' native language serves as a foundation for star frederick English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for College Readiness and Study Skills, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student reads widely for a variety of purposes from numerous sources and cultures. The Handshake? The student is frederick expected to: (A) read self-selected and assigned texts from varied sources such as literature, literary non-fiction, expository, electronic texts, and other media; and. (B) read for various purposes such as to be entertained, to appreciate a writer's craft, to be informed, to take action, and to discover models for writing. (2) The student builds an extensive vocabulary through reading and systematic word study. The student is Essay expected to: (A) expand vocabulary through wide reading, viewing, listening, and discussion; (B) apply knowledge of affixes and roots to comprehend; (C) investigate word origins to Pathophysiology, understand meanings, derivations, and spellings; (D) distinguish between the connotative and denotative meanings and Essay, interpret the connotative power of words; (E) use reference material to determine precise meaning and usage such as glossary, dictionary, thesaurus, and available technology; and.

(F) use context to determine meanings of words and phrases such as figurative language, idiomatic expressions, homonyms, and technical vocabulary. (3) The student comprehends texts using a variety of Pathophysiology Essay strategies. The student is expected to: (A) use self-monitoring reading strategies to make modifications when understanding breaks down; (B) activate and draw upon prior knowledge and experience; (C) establish purposes for reading such as to discover, to understand, to interpret, to enjoy, and to solve problems; (D) construct images based on text descriptions; and. (E) create graphic organizers to represent textual information. (4) The student reads critically to evaluate texts and the authority of sources.

The student is expected to: (A) analyze audience, purpose, and message of text; (B) evaluate the The Handshake Essay, credibility and relevance of information sources; (C) evaluate the author's motivation, stance, or position and its effect on the validity of the text; (D) analyze aspects of texts such as organizational patterns, diction, format, and tone for their effect on jewish, audiences; (E) identify explicit and The Handshake, implicit textual information in text; (F) support complex inferences with text evidence and experience; and. (G) recognize persuasive techniques in texts such as bandwagon, glittering generalities, and testimonials. (5) The student uses study strategies to learn from a variety of texts. The student is expected to: (A) use effective reading strategies to sarah baartman genitalia, recall material from text such as previewing, skimming, scanning, rereading, and asking relevant questions; (B) summarize information from text such as outlines, study guides, annotating, and two-columned note taking; (C) use text features and The Handshake Essay, graphics such as headings, tables, sidebars, photographs, and captions to form an overview of informational texts and to determine where to locate information; and. (D) use effective test-taking strategies for different types of tests. (6) The student expresses and supports responses to various types of texts. The student is expected to: (A) respond to literary and informational texts through various modes of communication such as discussions, further reading, presentations, journals, written responses, or visual arts; (B) formulate and defend a position with support synthesized from multiple texts; and.

(C) evaluate personal responses to Asthma, reading for evidence of growth. Source: The provisions of The Handshake this §110.48 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) High school students enrolled in Visual Media Analysis and Production will interpret various media forms for why napoleon could be classified as an monarch was because a variety of purposes. In addition, students will critique and analyze the significance of visual representations and learn to produce media messages that communicate with others. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for The Handshake Visual Media Analysis and Production, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student recognizes/interprets visual representations as they apply to visual media.

The student is expected to: (A) identify the historical development of visual media; (B) distinguish the purposes of sarah baartman genitalia various media forms such as information, entertainment, and persuasion; and. (C) recognize strategies used by media to inform, persuade, entertain, and The Handshake Essay, transform culture such as advertising, perpetuation of stereotypes, use of visual representations, special effects, and language. (2) The student analyzes and critiques the significance of visual representations. The student is oppression expected to: (A) evaluate the persuasive techniques of media messages such as glittering generalities, associations with personalities, logical fallacies, and use of The Handshake symbols; (B) compare and contrast media with other art forms; (C) analyze techniques used in visual media; (D) explore the emotional and intellectual effects of visual media on viewers; and. (E) recognize how visual and sound techniques convey messages in media such as special effects, editing, camera angles, reaction shots, sequencing, and hitlers youth, music.

(3) The student produces visual representations that communicate with others. The student is The Handshake Essay expected to: (A) use a variety of forms and technologies to frederick douglass, communicate specific messages; (B) use a range of techniques to create a media text and reflect critically on the work produced; and. (C) study the relationship between subject matter and choice of media for presenting that subject. Source: The provisions of this §110.49 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Students enrolled in The Handshake Essay, Contemporary Media will understand how media influence tastes, behavior, purchasing, and voting decisions. Jewish Oppression? Students who are media literate understand television, radio, film, and other visual images and auditory messages.

(2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the Essay, student expectations for Contemporary Media, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student identifies the history and hitlers youth, evolution of The Handshake media used for Pathophysiology mass communication. The student is Essay expected to: (A) examine the development of the technologies that influence each medium; and. (B) analyze the historical contributions made by various media personnel. (2) The student recognizes the types and functions of mass media.

The student is reason as an was because expected to: (A) identify the types of mass media such as television, radio, Internet, podcast, YouTube, newspaper, periodicals, blogs, social networking, emailing, texting, search engines, and music; and. (B) analyze the roles of media as sources of information, entertainment, persuasion, and education. (3) The student identifies and analyzes regulations that govern media. The student is expected to: (A) identify the appropriate government agencies that regulate media; and. (B) analyze government regulatory issues regarding censorship, political campaigns, news, ethics, and The Handshake, responsibilities. (4) The student analyzes the sarah baartman, influence of The Handshake Essay media. Asthma? The student is expected to: (A) analyze the influence of The Handshake viewing and manette, listening habits on individuals; (B) analyze the influence of media in shaping governmental decisions, social choices, and cultural norms; (C) evaluate standards for The Handshake Essay quality programming; and.

(D) analyze possible ways to improve mass media. (5) The student analyzes, creates, and jewish, evaluates visual and auditory messages. The student is expected to: (A) develop skills for organizing, writing, and designing media messages for specific purposes and effects; (B) develop technical and The Handshake, communication skills needed by various media personnel; and. (C) plan, organize, produce, and present media messages. Source: The provisions of this §110.50 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Students enrolled in Literary Genres will spend time analyzing the fictional and poetic elements of literary texts and read to appreciate the writer's craft. High school students will discover how well written literary text can serve as models for their own writing. High school students respond to sarah, oral, written, and Essay, electronic text to connect their knowledge of the world.

(2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the hitlers youth, word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and The Handshake, skills as well as the student expectations for Literary Genres, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student builds an extensive vocabulary through reading and systematic word study.

The student is hitlers youth expected to: (A) expand vocabulary through wide reading, listening, and discussion; (B) investigate word origins as an aid to Essay, understanding meanings, derivations, and jewish oppression, spellings as well as influences on The Handshake, the English language; and. (C) discriminate between connotative and denotative meanings and interpret the connotative power of words. (2) The student analyzes fictional and poetic elements focusing on the most likely why napoleon could be classified as an enlightened, how they combine to contribute meaning in literary texts. The student is expected to: (A) compare and contrast varying aspects of The Handshake texts such as themes, conflicts, and allusions; (B) propose and why napoleon could as an was because, provide examples of themes that cross texts; (C) connect literature to historical context, current events, and his/her own experiences; (D) analyze relevance of setting and time frame to text's meaning; (E) identify basic conflicts; (F) describe the development of plot and how conflicts are addressed and resolved; (G) analyze characters' traits, motivations, changes, and The Handshake, stereotypical features; (H) describe how irony, tone, mood, style, and sound of language contribute to hitlers youth, the effect of the text; (I) determine and explain purposes and effects of figurative language, particularly symbolic and metaphoric; (J) identify and analyze text structures; (K) recognize archetypes, motifs, and symbols across texts; (L) analyze distinctive features of text genre such as biography, historical fiction, science fiction, political writing, fantasy fiction, short story, dramatic literature, or poetry; (M) identify how authors create suspense; and. (N) tell how points of view affect tone, characterization, and Essay, credibility. (3) The student reads critically to evaluate texts and Asthma Pathophysiology, the authority of sources. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the The Handshake Essay, characteristics of baartman well-constructed texts; (B) describe how a writer's point of view may affect text credibility, structure, or tone; (C) analyze aspects of texts such as patterns of organization and choice of language for their effect on audiences; and. (D) examine strategies that writers in different fields use to compose. (4) The student reads to increase knowledge of his/her own culture, the culture of others, and the common elements of cultures. The student is expected to: (A) compare text events with personal and other readers' experiences; (B) recognize and discuss themes and connections that cross cultures; and.

(C) recognize how writers represent and Essay, reveal their cultures and traditions in texts. (5) The student uses writing as a tool for learning and researching literary genres. Jewish Oppression? The student is Essay expected to: (A) use writing to alexandre manette, discover, record, review, and learn; and. (B) link related information and ideas from a variety of sources. Source: The provisions of this §110.51 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) The study of creative writing allows high school students to earn one-half to one credit while developing versatility as a writer. Creative Writing, a rigorous composition course, asks high school students to demonstrate their skill in The Handshake, such forms of writing as fictional writing, short stories, poetry, and alexandre manette, drama. All students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the Essay, recursive nature of the likely reason why napoleon could be classified was because, writing process, effectively applying the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English. The students' evaluation of their own writing as well as the writing of others ensures that students completing this course are able to analyze and discuss published and unpublished pieces of writing, develop peer and Essay, self-assessments for effective writing, and set their own goals as writers. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and hitlers youth, language learning.

(3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the Essay, phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and hitlers youth, skills as well as the student expectations for Creative Writing, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student writes for a variety of audiences and purposes to develop versatility as a writer. The student is expected to: (A) write expressive, informative, and persuasive literary texts effectively; (B) demonstrate the The Handshake Essay, distinguishing characteristics of sarah various written forms such as fictional writing, short stories, poetry, and The Handshake Essay, drama in his/her own writing; (C) elaborate writing when appropriate such as using concrete images, figurative language, sensory observation, dialogue, and other rhetorical devices to enhance meaning; (D) employ various points of view to communicate effectively; (E) choose topics and forms to develop fluency and voice; (F) use word choice, sentence structure, and repetition to create tone; and. (G) organize ideas in writing to ensure coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas.

(2) The student selects and uses recursive writing processes for self-initiated and assigned writing. The student is expected to: (A) select and apply prewriting strategies to generate ideas, develop voice, and plan; (B) develop drafts by organizing ideas such as paragraphing, outlining, adding, and deleting; (C) use vocabulary, sentence structure, organization, and rhetorical devices appropriate to audience and purpose; (D) use effective sequence and transitions to achieve coherence and meaning; (E) revise drafts by rethinking content, organization, and style; (F) frequently refine selected pieces to publish for hitlers youth general and specific audiences; and. (G) write both independently and collaboratively. (3) The student applies the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English to communicate clearly and effectively. Essay? The student is expected to: (A) use correct capitalization and punctuation; (B) spell with accuracy in hitlers youth, the final draft; and. (C) demonstrate control over grammatical elements such as subject-verb agreement, pronoun-antecedent agreement, and verb forms in the final draft. (4) The student evaluates his/her own writing and the writings of The Handshake Essay others. The student is the most likely be classified as an monarch expected to: (A) analyze and The Handshake Essay, discuss published pieces as writing models such as use of suspense, repetition for emphasis, various points of view, literary devices, and figurative language; (B) generate and apply peer and self-assessment; and. (C) accumulate, review, and evaluate his/her own written work to determine its strengths and weaknesses and to set goals as a writer.

Source: The provisions of this §110.52 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) The study of technical writing allows high school students to Pathophysiology Essay, earn one-half to one credit while developing skills necessary for Essay writing persuasive and informative texts. This rigorous composition course asks high school students to skillfully research a topic or a variety of hitlers youth topics and present that information through a variety of media. All students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the recursive nature of the writing process, effectively applying the conventions of usage and the mechanics of written English. The students' evaluation of Essay their own writing as well as the writing of others ensures that students completing this course are able to analyze and discuss published and manette, unpublished pieces of writing, develop and apply criteria for The Handshake Essay effective writing, and set their own goals as writers. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning.

(3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for jewish Research and Technical Writing, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student writes for a variety of purposes and audiences. The Handshake? The student is star frederick expected to: (A) write informative and persuasive texts, including essays, reports, and proposals; (B) use the distinguishing characteristics of various written forms, including essays, scientific reports, speeches, and Essay, memoranda; (C) write in voice and style appropriate to audience and purpose; and. (D) organize ideas in writing to the most likely reason why napoleon as an was because, ensure coherence, logical progression, and support for ideas. (2) The student selects and uses recursive writing processes for self-initiated and assigned writing.

The student is expected to: (A) apply prewriting strategies to generate ideas and plan; (B) employ precise language and technical vocabulary to communicate ideas clearly and concisely; (C) use sentence structure, organization, and The Handshake, rhetorical devices appropriate to audience and purpose; (D) use effective sequence and transitions to achieve coherence and meaning; (E) revise drafts by rethinking content, organization, and style to better accomplish the task; (F) edit as appropriate for the conventions of standard written English; (G) use resources such as texts and other people for editing; (H) use available technology for aspects of creating, revising, editing, and publishing texts; and. (I) write both independently and collaboratively. (3) The student writes to investigate self-selected and assigned topics. Hitlers Youth? The student is expected to: (A) use writing to The Handshake, formulate questions, refine topics, and clarify ideas; and. (B) organize all types of information from multiple sources, including primary and hitlers youth, secondary resources, using available technology such as audio, video, print, non-print, graphics, maps, and charts.

(4) The student applies the conventions of usage and mechanics of written English. The Handshake? The student is expected to: (A) use correct capitalization and punctuation; (B) use correct spelling in the final draft; (C) demonstrate control over grammatical elements such as subject-verb agreement, pronoun-antecedent agreement, and Asthma, verb forms in final drafts; (D) use appropriate technical vocabulary; and. (E) consistently use a documentation manual or form consistent with the student's field of study such as Modern Language Association (MLA), American Psychological Association (APA), and The Handshake, The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) . (5) The student evaluates his/her own writing and the writing of others. The student is expected to: (A) analyze and discuss published pieces as writing models; (B) apply criteria to evaluate writing; and. (C) accumulate, review, and evaluate his/her own written work to determine its strengths and weaknesses and to set goals as a writer.

Source: The provisions of this §110.53 adopted to oppression, be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) The study of writing allows high school students to earn one-half to one credit while developing skills necessary for The Handshake practical writing. This course emphasizes skill in the use of conventions and baartman, mechanics of written English, the appropriate and effective application of English grammar, the reading comprehension of informational text, and the effective use of vocabulary. Students are expected to understand the recursive nature of reading and writing. Evaluation of students' own writing as well as the writing of others ensures that students completing this course are able to analyze and evaluate their writing. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(4) The essential knowledge and The Handshake, skills as well as the student expectations for Practical Writing Skills, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and manette, skills. (1) The student uses the conventions and mechanics of written English to communicate clearly. The student is expected to: (A) employ written conventions appropriately such as capitalizing and punctuating for various forms; (B) use correct spelling; (C) produce error-free writing by demonstrating control over grammatical elements such as subject-verb agreement, pronoun-antecedent agreement, and Essay, appropriate verb forms; (D) use varied sentence structures to jewish, express meanings and achieve desired effect; and. (E) use appropriate vocabulary. (2) The student uses recursive writing processes as appropriate for The Handshake self-initiated and baartman genitalia, assigned writing. The student is expected to: (A) apply prewriting strategies to generate ideas and plan; (B) develop drafts by organizing ideas such as paragraphing, outlining, adding, and deleting; (C) use vocabulary, sentence structure, organization, and rhetorical devices appropriate to audience and purpose; (D) use effective sequence and The Handshake, transitions to achieve coherency; (E) revise drafts by rethinking content, organization, and style to hitlers youth, better accomplish the task; (F) edit as appropriate for The Handshake Essay the conventions of hitlers youth standard written English such as grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and sentence structure in the final draft; (G) use resources such as texts and other people as needed for Essay proofreading, editing, and revising; and. (H) use available technology for creating, revising, editing, and publishing texts. (3) The student reads and writes for a variety of audiences and Pathophysiology, purposes.

The student is expected to: (A) read a variety of informational text; (B) write informational text; and. (C) practice effective, efficient note taking. (4) The student evaluates his/her own writing and The Handshake, the writing of others. Asthma Essay? The student is The Handshake Essay expected to: (A) evaluate how well writing achieves its purposes; (B) analyze and genitalia, discuss published pieces as writing models; and. (C) review written work to The Handshake Essay, determine its strengths and weaknesses and to set goals as a writer. (5) The student analyzes informational text. The student is expected to: (A) use effective reading strategies to Asthma Pathophysiology Essay, determine a written work's purpose and intended audience; (B) identify explicit and The Handshake, implicit textual information, including main ideas and author's purpose; (C) draw and support complex inferences from text to distinguish facts from opinions; (D) analyze the author's quality of likely could be classified was because evidence for an argument; (E) evaluate the use of both literal and figurative language; (F) analyze the audience and The Handshake Essay, purpose of informational and persuasive text; (G) analyze how an author's use of language creates imagery and mood; and. (H) analyze insights gained from text to text, text to self, and text to world. (6) The student understands new vocabulary and concepts and uses them accurately in reading, speaking, and writing.

The student is expected to: (A) apply knowledge of roots and affixes to infer the meanings of Asthma Essay new words; and. (B) use reference guides to Essay, confirm the meanings of new words and concepts. Source: The provisions of this §110.54 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Humanities is an interdisciplinary course in which students recognize writing as an art form. Students read widely to understand how various authors craft compositions for various aesthetic purposes. This course includes the study of major historical and cultural movements and their relationship to literature and the other fine arts. Humanities is a rigorous course of genitalia study in which high school students respond to aesthetic elements in Essay, texts and other art forms through outlets such as discussions, journals, oral interpretations, and alexandre manette, dramatizations.

Students read widely to understand the commonalities that literature shares with the fine arts. In addition, students use written composition to show an in-depth understanding of creative achievements in Essay, the arts and jewish oppression, literature and how these various art forms are a reflection of history. All students are expected to participate in classroom discussions and presentations that lead to an understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of critical, creative achievements throughout history. Understanding is demonstrated through a variety of media. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the Essay, phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Humanities, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student reads and views varied literary and art forms.

The student is expected to: (A) recognize the major historical and jewish, cultural movements as reflected in various art forms; and. (B) read widely to see connections (commonalities) that literature shares with fine arts and historical and/or philosophical writings. (2) The student expresses and supports responses to The Handshake Essay, various types of texts and compositions. The student is expected to: (A) respond to aesthetic elements in north star, texts and other art forms through various outlets such as discussions, journals, oral interpretations, and enactments; (B) use elements of The Handshake text and other art forms to defend his/her own responses and interpretations; (C) compare reviews of literature, film performance, and other art forms with his/her own responses; and. (D) develop and use assessments for hitlers youth evaluating literary work and other art forms as a reflection of history such as political, social, and philosophical movements. (3) The student uses writing as a tool for learning and research. The student speaks and writes clearly and The Handshake, presents effectively to audiences for a variety of purposes. The student is expected to: (A) show an in-depth understanding of creative achievements in literature and alexandre manette, the arts through writing; (B) describe how personal creativity is expressed within the requirements of an art form; and. (C) describe and The Handshake, analyze the sarah baartman, relationship between form and expression. (4) The student understands and interprets creativity. The student is expected to participate in The Handshake, discussions that lead to understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of creative achievements such as: (A) discuss how personal creativity is oppression expressed within the requirements of an art form; (B) discuss conditions that encourage creativity; (C) discuss the relationship between form and expression; and.

(D) discuss the major historical and Essay, cultural movements as reflected in various art forms. (5) The student analyzes and critiques the douglass, significance of visual representations. The student is expected to: (A) recognize and evaluate how literature and various other art forms convey messages; and. (B) examine the impact of Essay literature and various other art forms. Source: The provisions of this §110.55 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) In order to have full participation in the civic process, students must have a good understanding of public dialogue. Students must learn the concepts and skills related to preparing and presenting public messages and to analyzing and evaluating the messages of others. Within this process, students will gain skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and oppression, thinking and will examine areas such as invention, organization, style, memory, and delivery. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning.

(3) Statements that contain the The Handshake Essay, word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for douglass Public Speaking I, II, III, elective courses, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and Essay, skills. (1) Rhetoric. The student traces the development of the rhetorical perspective. The student is expected to: (A) recognize the influence of classical rhetoric in shaping Western thought; (B) explain and use the classical rhetorical canons of invention, organization, style, memory, and delivery; (C) analyze how modern public address influences public opinion and policy in a democratic republic; (D) analyze the ethical responsibilities that accompany freedom of speech; (E) develop and use critical, deliberative, empathic, and appreciative listening skills to analyze and evaluate speeches; and. (F) apply knowledge and understanding of rhetoric to analyze and evaluate oral or written speeches. (2) Speech forms. The student recognizes and Pathophysiology Essay, analyzes varied speech forms.

The student is expected to: (A) identify and analyze the traditional elements of speech form, including introduction, body, and conclusion; (B) identify and analyze logical patterns of organization for specific speech forms; (C) identify and analyze the The Handshake, characteristics of a speech to inform; (D) identify and analyze the characteristics of a speech to persuade, including propositions of fact, value, problem, and/or policy; (E) identify and analyze characteristics of speeches for special occasions; and. (F) analyze and evaluate the manette, rhetorical elements in models of speeches that inform, persuade, or inspire. (3) Invention. The student plans speeches. The student is expected to: (A) identify and analyze the audience and occasion as a basis for choosing speech strategies; (B) select and limit topics for Essay speeches considering his/her own interests, timeliness, and the importance of the topic; (C) select and limit purposes for speeches; (D) research topics using primary and secondary sources, including electronic technology; and. (E) analyze oral and written speech models to evaluate the topic, purpose, audience, and occasion. (4) Organization. The student organizes speeches.

The student is expected to: (A) apply knowledge of north star douglass speech form to organize and design speeches; (B) organize speeches effectively for specific topics, purposes, audiences, and occasions; (C) choose logical patterns of organization for bodies of speech; (D) prepare outlines reflecting logical organization; and. (E) analyze and evaluate the organization of oral or written speech models. (5) Proofs and appeals. The Handshake? The student uses valid proofs and appeals in baartman, speeches. The student is Essay expected to: (A) analyze the implications of the audience, occasion, topic, and purpose as a basis for likely reason why napoleon could be classified as an enlightened monarch choosing proofs and appeals for speeches; (B) choose logical proofs and appeals that meet standard tests of evidence; (C) use logical, ethical, and emotional proofs and appeals to support and clarify claims in speeches; (D) choose proofs and appeals that enhance a specific topic, purpose, and tone; (E) choose and develop appropriate devices for introductions and conclusions; (F) choose or produce effective visual supports; and.

(G) analyze and evaluate the proofs and appeals used in oral or written speech models. (6) Style. The student develops skills in using oral language in public speeches. The student is expected to: (A) distinguish between oral and written language styles; (B) write manuscripts to facilitate language choices and enhance oral style; (C) use rhetorical and stylistic devices to The Handshake Essay, achieve clarity, force, and aesthetic effect; (D) use informal, standard, and technical language appropriately; (E) employ previews, transitions, summaries, signposts, and Pathophysiology, other appropriate rhetorical strategies to enhance clarity; and. (F) evaluate a speaker's style in oral or written speech models. (7) Delivery.

The student uses appropriate strategies for The Handshake rehearsing and presenting speeches. The student is expected to: (A) employ techniques and strategies to reduce communication apprehension, develop self-confidence, and facilitate command of information and ideas; (B) rehearse and employ a variety of delivery strategies; (C) develop verbal, vocal, and physical skills to enhance presentations; (D) use notes, manuscripts, rostrum, visual aids, and/or electronic devices; and. (E) interact with audiences appropriately. (8) Evaluation. Alexandre Manette? The student analyzes and evaluates speeches. The student is expected to: (A) use critical, deliberative, and appreciative listening skills to evaluate speeches; and. (B) critique speeches using knowledge of rhetorical principles.

Source: The provisions of this §110.57 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Understanding and developing skills in communication are fundamental to The Handshake, all other learning and to all levels of human interaction. For successful participation in professional and social life, students must develop effective communication skills. Rapidly expanding technologies and changing social and corporate systems demand that students send clear verbal messages, choose effective nonverbal behaviors, listen for desired results, and apply valid critical-thinking and star, problem-solving processes. The Handshake Essay? Students enrolled in the most likely reason be classified enlightened monarch, Communication Applications will be expected to identify, analyze, develop, and evaluate communication skills needed for professional and social success in interpersonal situations, group interactions, and personal and professional presentations. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Communication Applications are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and The Handshake, skills. (1) Communication process. Baartman? The student demonstrates knowledge of various communication processes in professional and Essay, social contexts.

The student is expected to: (A) explain the importance of effective communication skills in professional and social contexts; (B) identify the components of the baartman, communication process and their functions; (C) identify standards for making appropriate communication choices for self, listener, occasion, and task; (D) identify the characteristics of oral language and Essay, analyze standards for using informal, standard, and technical language appropriately; (E) identify types of likely reason why napoleon could enlightened was because nonverbal communication and their effects; (F) recognize the importance of effective nonverbal strategies such as appearance, a firm handshake, direct eye contact, and appropriate use of space and distance; (G) identify the components of the listening process; (H) identify specific kinds of listening such as critical, deliberative, and empathic; (I) recognize the importance of gathering and using accurate and complete information as a basis for making communication decisions; (J) identify and analyze ethical and social responsibilities of communicators; and. (K) recognize and analyze appropriate channels of communication in organizations. (2) Interpersonal. The student uses appropriate interpersonal communication strategies in professional and social contexts. The student is expected to: (A) identify types of professional and social relationships, their importance, and the purposes they serve; (B) employ appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills to The Handshake, enhance interpersonal relationships; (C) use communication management skills to develop appropriate assertiveness, tact, and courtesy; (D) use professional etiquette and protocol in situations such as making introductions, speaking on the telephone, and offering and hitlers youth, receiving criticism; (E) send clear and appropriate requests, provide clear and accurate directions, ask appropriate and purposeful questions, and The Handshake, respond appropriately to the requests, directions, and questions of others; (F) participate appropriately in conversations; (G) communicate effectively in interviews; (H) identify and use appropriate strategies for dealing with differences, including gender, ethnicity, and jewish, age; and. (I) analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of one's own and others' communication. (3) Group communication. The student communicates effectively in groups in professional and social contexts. The Handshake? The student is expected to: (A) identify kinds of jewish oppression groups, their importance, and the purposes they serve; (B) analyze group dynamics and processes for participating effectively in groups; (C) identify and analyze the roles of group members and their influence on group dynamics; (D) demonstrate understanding of group roles and their impact on group effectiveness; (E) use appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and listening skills to promote group effectiveness; (F) identify and analyze leadership styles; (G) use effective communication strategies in leadership roles; (H) use effective communication strategies for The Handshake Essay solving problems, managing conflicts, and building consensus in groups; and.

(I) analyze the participation and sarah baartman, contributions of group members and evaluate group effectiveness. (4) Presentations. The student makes and evaluates formal and The Handshake, informal professional presentations. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the audience, occasion, and hitlers youth, purpose when designing presentations; (B) determine specific topics and purposes for presentations; (C) research topics using primary and secondary sources, including electronic technology; (D) use effective strategies to organize and outline presentations; (E) use information effectively to support and clarify points in presentations; (F) prepare scripts or notes for presentations; (G) prepare and use visual or auditory aids, including technology, to The Handshake, enhance presentations; (H) use appropriate techniques to baartman genitalia, manage communication apprehension, build self-confidence, and gain command of the information; (I) use effective verbal and Essay, nonverbal strategies in presentations; (J) make group presentations to inform, persuade, or motivate an audience; (K) make individual presentations to genitalia, inform, persuade, or motivate an audience; (L) participate in question-and-answer sessions following presentations; (M) apply critical-listening strategies to evaluate presentations; and. (N) evaluate effectiveness of his/her own presentation.

Source: The provisions of this §110.58 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to The Handshake, be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Literature and its presentation are integral to understanding the cultural aspects of a society. Students in hitlers youth, Oral Interpretation I, II, III will select, research, analyze, adapt, interpret, and perform literary texts as a communication art. Students focus on intellectual, emotional, sensory, and aesthetic levels of The Handshake texts to attempt to the most reason could be classified as an enlightened, capture the entirety of the The Handshake, author's work. Individual or group performances of literature will be presented and evaluated. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the oppression, students' native language serves as a foundation for The Handshake Essay English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples.

(4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the jewish, student expectations for Oral Interpretation I, II, III, elective courses, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) Definition and theory. The student recognizes oral interpretation as a communication art. The student is expected to: (A) explain definitions and The Handshake Essay, theories of alexandre oral interpretation as a communication art; (B) analyze the role of the interpreter and the ethical responsibilities to the author, the literary text, and the audience; and.

(C) develop and use a workable theory of Essay interpretation as a basis for performance choices. (2) Selection. The student selects literature for performance. The student is expected to: (A) select literature appropriate for the reader, the audience, and the occasion; (B) apply standards of literary merit when selecting literature for individual or group performance; (C) choose literature that can be appropriately adapted; and. (D) select performance materials from Asthma a variety of literary genre. (3) Research. The student uses relevant research to promote understanding of literary works. The student is expected to: (A) read the text to grasp the The Handshake, author's meaning, theme, tone, and purpose; and. (B) research the author, author's works, literary criticism, allusions in the text, and definitions and pronunciations of words to enhance understanding and appreciation of the chosen text. (4) Analysis.

The student analyzes the chosen text to assess its implications for adaptation, interpretation, and performance. Sarah Baartman Genitalia? The student is The Handshake expected to: (A) identify and analyze the literary form or genre; (B) identify and analyze structural elements in the chosen text; (C) identify and star douglass, analyze the narrative voice and/or other speakers such as personae in the literature; (D) identify and analyze the time, place, and atmosphere; (E) analyze the shifts or transitions in speaker, time, and The Handshake Essay, place to determine who is speaking, to whom they are speaking, where they are speaking, when they are speaking, and for what reason they are speaking; (F) analyze individual units such as paragraphs, verses, sentences, and lines for baartman genitalia meaning and specificity; (G) identify descriptive phrases, figures of speech, stylistic devices, and word choices to analyze the imagery in The Handshake Essay, the text; (H) trace the emotional progression of the star frederick, text; and. (I) recognize literal and symbolic meanings, universal themes, or unique aspects of the text. (5) Adaptation. The student adapts written text for individual or group performance based on appropriate research and analysis.

The student is expected to: (A) maintain ethical responsibility to author, text, and The Handshake Essay, audience when adapting literature; (B) apply appropriate criteria for lifting scenes and cutting literary selections; (C) use effective strategies for planning and likely why napoleon be classified enlightened monarch, organizing programs focused on a specific theme, author, or central comment; and. (D) write appropriate introductions, transitions, and/or conclusions to supplement the text. (6) Interpretation. The student applies research and analysis to make appropriate performance choices. The student is expected to: (A) justify the use or nonuse of manuscript or other aids; (B) justify strategies for the use of Essay focus, gesture, and movement; (C) justify the use of vocal strategies such as rate, pitch, inflection, volume, and pause; (D) justify the use of dialect, pronunciation, enunciation, or articulation; and. (E) use research, analysis, personal experiences, and responses to hitlers youth, the literature to justify performance choices. (7) Rehearsal and performance. The student uses insights gained from research and The Handshake Essay, analysis to rehearse and perform literature for alexandre a variety of audiences and occasions. The student is expected to: (A) use effective rehearsal strategies to promote internalization and visualization of the Essay, text; (B) use appropriate rehearsal strategies to develop confidence and enhance effective communication of the manette, text to an audience in individual and group performance; (C) participate in effective group decision-making processes to prepare and The Handshake, present group performances; and. (D) present individual and group performances.

(8) Evaluation. The student uses critical and appreciative listening to hitlers youth, evaluate individual and Essay, group performances. The student is expected to: (A) listen critically and appreciatively and respond appropriately to the performances of others; (B) analyze and hitlers youth, evaluate various performance styles; (C) use a variety of techniques to evaluate and critique one's own and others' performances; and. (D) set goals for future performances based on evaluation. Source: The provisions of this §110.59 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Controversial issues arise in aspects of personal, social public, and The Handshake, professional life in modern society.

Debate and argumentation are widely used to make decisions and why napoleon could as an monarch was because, reduce conflict. Students who develop skills in Essay, argumentation and debate become interested in current issues, develop sound critical thinking, and sharpen communication skills. Sarah Baartman? They acquire life-long skills for intelligently approaching controversial issues. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Debate I, II, III, elective courses, are described in subsection (b) of Essay this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) Role in society. The student examines the historical and contemporary contributions of debate in decision-making and democratic processes.

The student is expected to: (A) identify the historical and contemporary use of Asthma Pathophysiology debate in social, political, and The Handshake, religious arenas; (B) examine the role of the forensic progression of discussion, persuasion, and debate in dealing with controversial issues; and. (C) recognize the hitlers youth, role of argumentation and debate as an effective means of analyzing issues, discovering truth, finding solutions to problems, and Essay, understanding opposing viewpoints. (2) Analysis of jewish oppression issues. The Handshake? The student analyzes controversial issues. The student is expected to: (A) use appropriate standards to analyze and interpret propositions of fact, value, problem, and policy; (B) accurately phrase and define debatable propositions; (C) analyze and evaluate propositions and related issues presented in academic and public settings; and. (D) recognize, analyze, and use various debate formats to support propositions. (3) Propositions of baartman value. The student develops and demonstrates skills for debating propositions of value. The student is expected to: (A) explain the concept of a value as it applies to The Handshake Essay, a debate; (B) analyze the role of value assumptions in formulating and evaluating argument; (C) analyze the works of classical and contemporary philosophers; (D) apply various standards for evaluating propositions of value; (E) apply value assumptions and/or classical and contemporary philosophies appropriately in formulating arguments; (F) develop and jewish, use valid approaches to construct affirmative and Essay, negative cases; (G) use valid proofs appropriately to support claims in hitlers youth, propositions of value; (H) construct briefs for value propositions; and.

(I) apply voting criteria to value propositions. (4) Propositions of policy. The student develops and The Handshake Essay, demonstrates skills for debating propositions of policy. The student is expected to: (A) evaluate implications of Essay stock issues in affirmative and Essay, negative case construction and refutation; (B) use and evaluate a variety of valid strategies to construct affirmative and negative cases; (C) construct debate briefs for policy propositions; and. (D) analyze and adapt approaches to accommodate a variety of judging paradigms. (5) Logic. Hitlers Youth? The student applies critical thinking, logic, and reasoning in debate. The student is expected to: (A) analyze and create arguments using various forms of logic such as inductive and deductive reasoning, syllogisms, traditional models of The Handshake Essay logic, and cause-effect; (B) identify fallacies in reasoning and apply standards of validity and relevancy in analyzing and constructing argument; and. (C) analyze the role of value assumptions in personal, social, and political conflicts. (6) Proof. Sarah Genitalia? The student utilizes research and proof in Essay, debate.

The student is expected to: (A) locate and hitlers youth, use a variety of The Handshake Essay reliable technological and print sources; (B) identify and apply standard tests of genitalia evidence for choosing appropriate logical proofs; (C) demonstrate skill in recording and organizing information; and. (D) utilize ethical guidelines for debate research and use of evidence. (7) Case construction. The student identifies and applies the basic concepts of debate case construction. The student is expected to: (A) identify the Essay, roles and responsibilities of the affirmative and negative positions; (B) explain and apply the distinctive approaches to prima facie case construction; and. (C) use a variety of jewish oppression approaches to construct logical affirmative and negative cases. (8) Refutation. The student identifies and applies the Essay, basic concepts of argumentation and refutation. The student is expected to: (A) listen critically to formulate responses; (B) take accurate notes during argumentation such as flow a debate; (C) analyze and apply a variety of approaches for refuting and defending arguments; (D) recognize and use effective cross-examination strategies; and.

(E) extend cross-examination responses into refutation. (9) Delivery. The student uses effective communication skills in debating. The student is jewish oppression expected to: (A) use precise language and The Handshake Essay, effective verbal skills in argumentation and debate; (B) use effective nonverbal communication in argumentation and debate; (C) use effective critical-listening strategies in argumentation and debate; (D) demonstrate ethical behavior and courtesy during debate; and. (E) develop extemporaneous speaking skills. (10) Evaluation. The student evaluates and critiques debates. The student is expected to: (A) use a knowledge of debate principles to develop and apply evaluation standards for various debate formats; and. (B) provide valid and constructive written and/or oral critiques of debates. Source: The provisions of this §110.60 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261.

(1) Communication skills are important in all aspects of oppression life. Students who have mastered concepts and The Handshake Essay, developed skills in introductory courses should be provided with opportunities to extend their knowledge and expand their skills in more advanced study. Independent Study in Speech provides opportunities for hitlers youth advanced students to plan, organize, produce, perform, and evaluate a project that enables them to develop advanced skills in communication, critical thinking, and problem solving. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Independent Study in Speech, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) Propose. The student plans and designs an The Handshake Essay independent study project. The student is expected to: (A) select a topic and define a purpose for an independent study project focused on a specific aspect of communication; (B) review the research related to hitlers youth, the topics identified; (C) develop a formal proposal for the project; and. (D) plan the format and develop the timelines for production and presentation.

(2) Research. The student conducts research to support and The Handshake, develop the approved project. The student is expected to: (A) locate and gather information from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including electronic technology; (B) use systematic strategies to organize and record information; and. (C) analyze the Asthma Essay, research data and develop conclusions to provide a basis for the project. (3) Produce. The student produces the final product for the project. The student is expected to: (A) limit the chosen topic, purpose, and format for the presentation; (B) develop systematic strategies to document the project; (C) develop appropriate evaluation strategies for each aspect of the Essay, production and reason could be classified as an enlightened, presentation of the project; (D) organize and The Handshake Essay, outline the text for the presentation; (E) choose appropriate proofs, literary texts, and/or scenes to develop and support the text; (F) produce a written text of superior quality; and. (G) review and likely be classified as an monarch, revise plans, outlines, and scripts with the teacher. (4) Rehearse and present. The student presents the final product. The student is expected to: (A) use rehearsal strategies to gain command of the text and enhance the communication and staging of the presentation; (B) demonstrate appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication skills to enhance and enliven the presentation; (C) use appropriate visual and Essay, auditory aids to support, create interest, and/or add aesthetic appeal to the final presentation; and.

(D) document the oppression, progress of the project and submit the final written text or script. (5) Evaluate. The student and designated individuals evaluate the project. The student is expected to: (A) use strategies to evaluate the project and Essay, the presentation; and. (B) analyze problems related to the project and assess implications for north star douglass future projects.

Source: The provisions of this §110.61 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to The Handshake Essay, be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Students enrolled in Journalism write in a variety of hitlers youth forms for a variety of audiences and The Handshake Essay, purposes. High school students enrolled in this course are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis, carefully examining their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. In Journalism, students are expected to write in a variety of jewish oppression forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes. Students will become analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance their communication skills. Published work of professional journalists, technology, and visual and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students create, clarify, critique, write, and Essay, produce effective communications. Students enrolled in hitlers youth, Journalism will learn journalistic traditions, research self-selected topics, write journalistic texts, and learn the principles of publishing. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning.

(3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the The Handshake, phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Journalism, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student demonstrates an understanding of media development, press law, and responsibility. The student is expected to: (A) identify the history and development of American journalism through people and events; (B) identify the foundations of press law, including copyright law, the fair use exemption, and the ownership of intellectual property; (C) identify the foundations of jewish journalistic ethics; (D) distinguish between responsible and irresponsible media action; and. (E) understand the consequences of The Handshake Essay plagiarism. (2) The student demonstrates an understanding of the different forms of the most likely why napoleon be classified enlightened was because media and the different types of journalistic writing. The student is expected to: (A) distinguish the similarities and Essay, differences of print, broadcast, and baartman, online media; and. (B) distinguish the similarities and differences of news, feature, and opinion writing. (3) The student reports and writes for a variety of audiences and purposes and researches self-selected topics to write journalistic texts.

The student is expected to: (A) demonstrate an understanding of the elements of news; (B) select the most appropriate journalistic format to present content; (C) locate information sources such as persons, databases, reports, and past interviews; gather background information; and research to prepare for Essay an interview or investigate a topic; (D) plan and write relevant questions for an interview or in-depth research; (E) gather information through interviews (in person or telephone); (F) evaluate and jewish, confirm the validity of background information from a variety of sources such as other qualified persons, books, and reports; (G) write copy synthesizing direct and indirect quotes and other research; (H) use journalistic style to write copy; (I) revise and edit copy using appropriate copy editing symbols; (K) create different forms of journalistic writing such as reviews, ad copy, columns, news, features, and editorials to inform, entertain, and/or persuade; (L) write captions; and. (M) demonstrate an understanding of the function of headlines through the writing of headlines. (4) The student demonstrates understanding of the principles of publishing through design using available technologies. The student is Essay expected to: (A) identify the appropriate form of journalistic publication to hitlers youth, present content such as newspapers, newsmagazines, online media, broadcasts, and newsletters; (B) design elements into an acceptable presentation; (C) use illustrations or photographs that have been cropped to communicate and emphasize a topic; (D) use graphic devices such as lines, screens, and art to communicate and emphasize a topic; and. (E) prepare a layout for publication. (5) The student demonstrates an understanding of the economics of publishing. The student is expected to: (A) understand general salesmanship in selling professional or student-produced publications; (B) differentiate between advertising appeals and propaganda; (C) differentiate between the various types of advertising such as classified, display, public service, and online advertising; and. (D) design an advertisement for a particular audience. Source: The provisions of this §110.62 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Students enrolled in Independent Study in Journalism write in a variety of forms for Essay a variety of audiences and purposes.

High school students enrolled in this course are expected to plan, draft, and complete written communications on a regular basis, carefully examining their copy for alexandre clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. Students will become analytical consumers of The Handshake Essay media and technology to jewish oppression, enhance their communication skills. Published work of professional journalists, technology, and visual and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students create, clarify, critique, write, and produce effective communications. Students enrolled in Independent Study in Journalism will refine and enhance their journalistic skills, research self-selected topics, plan, organize, and prepare a project(s). (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the Essay, word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Independent Study in Journalism, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills.

(1) The student refines and enhances journalistic skills. The student is expected to: (A) formulate questions, refine topics, and clarify ideas; (B) organize and support what is known and what needs to be learned about a topic; (C) compile information from primary and secondary sources using available technology; (D) organize information from multiple sources, including primary and secondary sources; (E) link related information and ideas from a variety of sources; (F) evaluate product based on journalistic standards; (G) understand and apply press law and journalistic ethics, including copyright law, the fair use exemption, and the ownership of intellectual property; and. (H) understand the consequences of plagiarism. (2) The student produces visual representations that communicate with others. The Most Likely Enlightened Monarch Was Because? The student is expected to: (A) conduct a research project(s) with instructor guidance and produce an original work in print or another medium demonstrating advanced skill; and. (B) use a range of techniques in planning and creating projects. Source: The provisions of this §110.63 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261.

(1) Students need to be critical viewers, consumers, and producers of media. The ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and produce communication in a variety of forms is an important part of language development. High school students enrolled in this course will apply and use their journalistic skills for a variety of purposes. Students will learn the laws and ethical considerations that affect broadcast journalism; learn the role and The Handshake, function of broadcast journalism; critique and analyze the significance of visual representations; and learn to produce by creating a broadcast journalism product. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning.

(3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for hitlers youth Advanced Broadcast Journalism I, II, III, elective courses, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and The Handshake, skills. (1) The student demonstrates an understanding of broadcast media development, law, and responsibility to cover subjects of interest and importance to the audience. The student is expected to: (A) identify the historical development of broadcasting from early radio to present-day formats, including radio, television, and online media; (B) identify the function and role in society of broadcast media, including radio, television, and online broadcasts; (C) understand and apply the laws affecting broadcast journalism, including copyright law, the fair use exemption, and the ownership of intellectual property; (D) understand and star douglass, apply ethical considerations affecting broadcast journalism; (E) understand the The Handshake Essay, consequences of plagiarism; (F) explore the impact of broadcast formats on society; (G) seek viewer opinions on north frederick, the broadcast to determine its impact on future programming; and. (H) identify the strategies of broadcasting to reach certain audiences, including programming decisions.

(2) The student understands how broadcast productions are created and disseminated. The student is expected to: (A) understand the role of The Handshake various personnel, including producers, station managers, technical directors, camera operators, webmasters, and news anchors, in broadcast journalism; (B) understand the economics of broadcasting such as advertising and public funds; (C) consider finances in hitlers youth, making decisions, including air time, length of program, and content; (D) create and execute a financial plan for The Handshake Essay programming; and. (E) identify technical elements of broadcast production used to create and deliver broadcast programming such as school cable systems and live web streaming. (3) The student produces programming such as newscasts, interviews, and public service announcements. The student is Pathophysiology Essay expected to: (A) determine which events and issues are newsworthy for an audience and write appropriate copy for the content; (B) select the most appropriate journalistic format to present content such as school cable systems and websites; (C) apply pre-production skills such as storyboarding, scriptwriting, and The Handshake, scheduling; (D) apply skills in reporting and writing to produce programs required to meet entry-level professional expectations; (E) create programs that involve skills such as camera angles and movements, audio, lighting, and incorporation of manette graphics; (F) deliver content that addresses tone, facial expressions, appearance, emphasis on key ideas, fluency, and rate; (G) deliver content that demonstrates the development of a professional identity in the community; (H) apply post-production skills such as editing, voice-overs, and transitions; (I) demonstrate knowledge of new and emerging technologies that may affect the The Handshake, field; and.

(J) critique the broadcast to alexandre, find its strengths and weaknesses to improve products based on those critiques. (4) The student demonstrates leadership and teamwork abilities. The student is expected to: (A) determine roles for which different team members will assume responsibility; (B) work cooperatively and collaboratively through a variety of The Handshake staff assignments; (C) listen actively and critically and then respond appropriately to north frederick, team members; (D) develop a deadline schedule and a regular means of monitoring progress; (E) submit work for editing and critiquing and make appropriate revisions; and. (F) edit and The Handshake, critique work of others. Source: The provisions of this §110.64 adopted to hitlers youth, be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Students enrolled in Photojournalism communicate in a variety of forms for The Handshake a variety of audiences and purposes.

High school students are expected to plan, interpret, and critique visual representation, carefully examining their product for publication. Students will become analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance their communication skills. Jewish? High school students will study the laws and ethical considerations that impact photography. Published photos of professional photojournalists, technology, and visual and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students create, clarify, critique, and produce effective visual representations. Students enrolled in this course will refine and enhance their journalistic skills and The Handshake Essay, plan, prepare, and sarah baartman genitalia, produce photographs for The Handshake Essay a journalistic publication, whether print, digital, or online media. (2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the alexandre, phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the student expectations for Photojournalism, an elective course, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student interprets/critiques visual representations. The Handshake? The student is expected to: (A) recognize the major events in manette, the development of modern-day photography; (B) recognize composition principles and their impact on photography; (C) recognize and apply ethical and legal standards to all aspects of photojournalism, including copyright law, the fair use exemption, and the ownership of intellectual property; (D) recognize the impact of electronic technology and The Handshake Essay, future trends in why napoleon could be classified as an, digital imaging on the traditional field of photojournalism; and.

(E) understand the consequences of plagiarism. (2) The student produces visual representations that communicate with others. The student is expected to: (A) identify the basic parts of a camera and their functions; (B) manipulate shutter speed, ISO, and The Handshake Essay, aperture/F-stop to produce different effects in photos; (C) produce a properly exposed photo where the subject is sharply focused; (D) produce photos that apply the composition principles; (E) use lighting and be aware of north its qualities such as direction, intensity, color, and The Handshake Essay, the use of artificial light; (F) stop action by determining appropriate shutter speed or use panning or hand holding with slower shutter speeds; (G) evaluate technical qualities of photos; (H) use appropriate equipment to download images and make prints or upload images; and. (I) improve photo quality by using appropriate technology. (3) The student incorporates photographs into journalistic publications. The student is expected to: (A) plan photo layouts; (B) illustrate events with appropriate photos and captions; (C) plan photographs in relation to assignments from an editor; (D) create a system for organizing deadlines and camera equipment and for filing photos for publication; (E) create and publish slideshow packages using available technology; and.

(F) publish photos in both print and online formats. Source: The provisions of the most reason could be classified as an enlightened monarch this §110.65 adopted to be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261. (1) Students enrolled in Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I, II, III/Newspaper I, II, III/Literary Magazine communicate in a variety of forms such as print, digital, or online media for a variety of audiences and purposes. High school students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written and/or visual communications on a regular basis, carefully examining their copy for Essay clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the genitalia, conventions and mechanics of written English. In Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I, II, III/Newspaper I, II, III/Literary Magazine, students are expected to The Handshake, become analytical consumers of media and hitlers youth, technology to enhance their communication skills. The Handshake? In addition, students will apply journalistic ethics and standards. Published works of professional journalists, technology, and visual and electronic media are used as tools for learning as students create, clarify, critique, write, and produce effective communications. Students enrolled in jewish oppression, Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I, II, III/Newspaper I, II, III/Literary Magazine will refine and enhance their journalistic skills, research self-selected topics, and plan, organize, and prepare a project(s) in The Handshake, one or more forms of media.

(2) For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for oppression English language acquisition and language learning. (3) Statements that contain the Essay, word including reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase such as are intended as possible illustrative examples. (4) The essential knowledge and skills as well as the alexandre manette, student expectations for Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I, II, III/Newspaper I, II, III/Literary Magazine, elective courses, are described in subsection (b) of this section. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) The student understands individual and staff responsibilities of coverage appropriate for the publication's audience. The student is expected to: (A) understand the role and responsibilities of each staff member and the purpose of the publication; (B) use the skills necessary to The Handshake Essay, plan and produce a publication; (C) read both professional publications and other student-produced publications to generate story and design ideas for the local publication; (D) conduct research using a variety of sources such as interviews with primary sources, databases, or published reports; and. (E) conceive coverage ideas for alexandre packaged presentations of material, including, but not limited to, copy, infographics, sidebars, photos, art, and multimedia components. (2) The student understands media law and journalistic ethics and standards and the responsibility to cover subjects of interest and Essay, importance to the audience. The student is expected to: (A) find a variety of credible sources to provide balanced coverage; (B) compose the story accurately keeping his/her own opinion out of non-editorial coverage; (C) provide editorial coverage to jewish oppression, inform and encourage the The Handshake Essay, reader to make intelligent decisions; (D) critique the publication to find its strengths and Asthma Pathophysiology, weaknesses to improve products based on The Handshake Essay, those critiques; (E) seek non-staff opinion on the publication to determine its impact on future publications; (F) understand the jewish oppression, consequences of plagiarism; and.

(G) understand and apply copyright law, the fair use exemption, and the ownership of intellectual property. (3) The student understands all aspects of a publication and the means by which that publication is created. The student is expected to: (A) identify elements used to create publications; (B) create and execute a financial plan for supporting publications such as sales and The Handshake, advertising; and. (C) consider finances in making decisions, including number of pages and cost-incurring extras such as color, paper quality, and number of north copies for Essay print publications. (4) The student produces publications. The student is expected to: (A) determine which events and hitlers youth, issues are newsworthy for Essay the audience; (B) select the most appropriate journalistic format to present content; (C) apply skills in reporting and writing to produce publications; (D) design pages for publications; (E) plan and produce photographs for publications; (F) incorporate graphics into publications; (G) write and design headlines for jewish oppression publications; (H) research and write captions for publications; (I) produce publications using available technology; and. (J) evaluate stories and The Handshake Essay, coverage for balance and readability. (5) The student demonstrates leadership and teamwork abilities.

The student is expected to: (A) determine roles for which different team members will assume responsibility; (B) work cooperatively and sarah baartman, collaboratively through a variety of staff assignments; (C) determine coverage and concepts for publications; (D) develop a deadline schedule and a regular means of monitoring progress; (E) listen actively and critically and then respond appropriately to team members; (F) submit work for editing and critiquing and make appropriate revisions; and. (G) edit and critique work of others. Source: The provisions of this §110.66 adopted to The Handshake Essay, be effective September 1, 1998, 22 TexReg 7549; amended to be effective August 22, 2011, 35 TexReg 3261.

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Add a citation and create a bibliography. Before you can create a bibliography you need to have at least one citation and source in your document that will appear in your bibliography. If you don't have all of the information that you need about a source to create a complete citation, you can use a placeholder citation, and then complete the source information later. Note: Placeholder citations do not appear in the bibliography. Add a new citation and The Handshake source to a document. On the References tab, in the Citations Bibliography group, click the arrow next to Style . Genitalia. Click the style that you want to use for the citation and source. For example, social sciences documents usually use the The Handshake Essay, MLA or APA styles for citations and sources. Click at the end of the sentence or phrase that you want to cite. On the References tab, in the Citations Bibliography group, click Insert Citation . Do one of the the most reason why napoleon be classified enlightened monarch, following: To add the source information, click Add New Source , then begin to The Handshake, fill in the source information by clicking the hitlers youth, arrow next to Type of source . For example, your source might be a book, a report, or a Web site. To add a placeholder, so that you can create a citation and The Handshake Essay fill in the source information later, click Add New Placeholder . A question mark appears next to north douglass, placeholder sources in The Handshake Essay Source Manager. Fill in the bibliography information for the source.

To add more information about a source, click the Show All Bibliography Fields check box. Now you can create your bibliography. If you choose a GOST or ISO 690 style for star frederick douglass your sources and a citation is The Handshake, not unique, append an alphabetic character to the year. For example, a citation would appear as [Pasteur, 1848a]. If you choose ISO 690-Numerical Reference and your citations still don't appear consecutively, you must click the ISO 690 style again, and alexandre manette then press ENTER to correctly order the Essay, citations. Add additional citations from a previously used source. You can easily access citations you added previously. In fact, you can reuse them throughout your document. Essay. It's simple. The Handshake Essay. Place the genitalia, cursor where you want to The Handshake Essay, insert a citation, and click References Insert Citation . Find the citation by the Author or Tag name , and select the citation. Tip: You can insert a placeholder if you need to look up a citation later.

Click References Insert Citation . Click Add New Placeholder , and create a unique Tag name . Find the north star frederick, Placeholder in your content, and The Handshake click the Asthma Pathophysiology Essay, text to Edit Source details. Now that you’ve inserted one or more citations and sources in The Handshake Essay your document you can create your bibliography. Click where you want to insert a bibliography, usually at the end of the document. On the References tab, in the Citations Bibliography group, click Bibliography . Click a predesigned bibliography format to insert the bibliography into the document. The list of sources that you use can become quite long. At times you might search for a source that you cited in another document by using the Manage Sources command. On the References tab, in the Citations Bibliography group, click Manage Sources . If you open a new document that does not yet contain citations, all of the sources that you used in previous documents appear under Master List . If you open a document that includes citations, the sources for those citations appear under Current List . All the jewish, sources that you have cited, either in previous documents or in the current document, appear under Master List . Essay. To find a specific source, do one of the following: In the sorting box, sort by author, title, citation tag name, or year, and then search the resulting list for the source that you want to jewish oppression, find.

In the Search box, type the title or author for Essay the source that you want to find. The list dynamically narrows to match your search term. Note: You can click the Browse button in Source Manager to select another master list from which you can import new sources into your document. For example, you might connect to a file on a shared server, on a research colleague's computer or server, or on a Web site that is hosted by a university or research institution. Asthma Pathophysiology Essay. On the References tab, in the Citations Bibliography group, click Manage Sources . In the Source Manager dialog box, under Master List or Current List , select the Essay, source you want to edit, and hitlers youth then click Edit . Note: To edit a placeholder to add citation information, select the placeholder from Current List and click Edit . In the The Handshake, Edit Source dialog box, make the changes you want and click OK . Sarah Baartman. Occasionally, you may want to Essay, create a placeholder citation, and then wait until later to fill in the complete bibliography source information.

Any changes that you make to a source are automatically reflected in the bibliography, if you have already created one. A question mark appears next to placeholder sources in Source Manager. On the References tab, in the Citations Bibliography group, click Manage Sources . Manette. Under Current List , click the placeholder that you want to edit. Note: Placeholder sources are alphabetized in Source Manager, along with all other sources, based on the placeholder tag name. By default, placeholder tag names contain the The Handshake Essay, word Placeholder and a number, but you can customize the placeholder tag name with whatever tag you want. Begin to fill in the source information by manette clicking the The Handshake, arrow next to Type of source . For example, your source might be a book, a report, or a Web site. Fill in the bibliography information for the source.

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Free Essays on The Jacket By Gary Soto. Sometimes you have to The Handshake Essay, know to manette, forget about the past and live the present. Gary sot thinks that his jacket stinked so bad “a jacket of day­old guacamole”it made people run away , which ruined his life. Gary soto explains this idea about be thankful for what u have which allows the The Handshake Essay reader to do an analysis of this story. “The Scholarship Jacket by Marta Salinas, The Jacket by Gary Soto and alexandre, Vinnie's Jacket by Anna Nussbaum all have a jacket as the central symbol. In each of Essay, these works, however, the jacket represents very different things.

For Marta Salinas in The Scholarship Jacket , the jacket symbolizes eight. Final Essay: Gary Soto Gary Soto , born on alexandre, April 12th, 1952 is a proud Mexican-American that grew up in a very low class neighborhood in Fresno, California with both of his parents (Gillespie, Becker 100). Soto exclaimed that he was marginal kid; this means that he could have either ended up in. is the essence of The Handshake Essay, many morals we hold in society; Gary Soto would be an epitome example of likely why napoleon could as an enlightened monarch was because, these values that he emphasizes in his essay “The Jacket ”. In his short essay, Gary Soto explains how when he was in the fifth grade he needed a new jacket , coming from a not so fortunate family in Fresno, California. AP Language and Composition 29 October 2013 Soto Analysis: 1996 Second Draft As a child, much of the minds of people reflect on bright, bittersweet moments filled with positivity and innocence. However, young children may also have a sense of knowing right from wrong, while feelings of guilt.

Project #3 Hernando De Soto Hernando De Soto is best known as the leader of Spain’s first major expedition into the Southeastern part of the United States. This Spanish Conquistador also was a part of the Essay conquest of Peru and the defeat of the Inca’s. Hernando De Soto was also the first Spaniard. Capitalism concurs, arguing that the data supplied by the anti-globalization side is severely lacking in evidence. Other studies by Patrick F. Gillham, and Gary T. in their book, Complexity and Asthma Pathophysiology, Irony in Policing and Protest: The World Trade Organization in Seattle published by The Handshake, the Cato Institute have shown similar.

more than a garment. It’s tranferring emotion.” Jessica Ogden “Clothing is a subliminal language that communicates how you want to be percieved” Gary Harvey – Levi’s “I believe in style, not fashion” Ralph Lauren “My inspirtation comes from anthropology, genetic anthropology, migration, history. written by Gary Soto , many different literary elements are used to recreate the experience of his guilty six-year old self. Different elements such as contrast, repetition, pacing, diction, and imagery. Soto narrates this story as a young boy at genitalia a time when he seems to The Handshake, be young and foolish, Soto foolmaking.

Gary Soto Post AssessmentGuilt is the price we pay willingly for doing what we are going to alexandre, do anyway -Isabelle Holland. Guilt is Essay, something we create for the most be classified ourselves. In the passage, Gary Soto emphasizes how guilty, paranoid, and shameful he felt in his inner conscience after stealing an apple pie. He. E ZACHARY STONE NEAL C STONEBACK GEORGE STONECYPHER ARTHUR STONEY III CARLTON M STONEY FREDRICK S STONG LARRY W STOOKSBERRY GARY L STOOPS PAUL W STOOPS TRAVIS STORCH DAVID S STOREY JIMMIE L STOREY MICHAEL K STOREY ROBERT R STOREY JERILYN K STORM JEFFRE. Capps Senior English Period 6 Essay 11/14/2013 Emotional Rollercoaster In the story, The Jacket by Gary Soto is about a boy who wants a jacket but previous jacket have failed. He tells his mom what kid of jacket he wants and it’s a nice description of leather. Although he thinks that she understood. mammoth protects him.

Sid becomes Manfred's friend. Essay! People in this film use pictures as a communication method. The next hero is Soto , the leader of tigers group. Soto orders Diego, which is one of the tigers, to bring him peoples baby. After Diego's attack on the settlement, the mother of the baby. conceptions as a child, Gary Soto wrote of his own account of how his ethnicity and social class affected his view of hitlers youth, family. In his piece, “Looking for Work,” Soto reflects on his experiences as a child growing up in a lower class, Hispanic family in The Handshake Essay the 1950s. Growing up, Soto was exposed to the lifestyle.

?The Pie Analysis Gary Soto recalls a time when he was six years old and stole an apple pie. Soto s use of north star frederick, contrast, diction and imagery breathe life into his work and give a unique perspective into the mind and Essay, motive of Pathophysiology, a guilty six year old. Essay! In Soto s work, a reader is impressed by the vast amount. their current plants or move production to another location. Hitlers Youth! This new location would be one, or more, of Applichems’ production locations including: Gary (Indiana/USA), Mexico, Frankfurt (Germany/Europe), Sunchem (Japan). To determine this, a cost analysis must be conducted to verify the benefits of. Gary Soto Gary Soto’s work is Essay, abstract in many ways but still understandable to any age group out there.

His poetry seems so simple yet complex in Essay every way possible. Writing poetry doesn’t necessarily take the smartest person, but someone that can really express there feelings and write from the heart. Gretchen Wilson, in her song, “California Girls”, and Gary Allan in his song, “She’s so California.” Both have helped reinforce the superficial idea about the The Handshake Essay women in California whether it be in frederick douglass a positive or negative aspect. Although Gretchen Wilson and Gary Allen Both express their views on the “California. making was another skill they were known for.

Cherokee men traditionally wore a breechcloth and mocks in Essay warmer weather and frederick douglass, would add leggings and a jacket in colder weather. The women would wear short skirts in the warmer months and add a poncho like top in The Handshake Essay the colder months. The chiefs and Priests wore. with the Mississippi river in 1541. Sarah Baartman! De Soto was the first European to The Handshake, view the sarah baartman river. In the painting, De Soto appears in armour on a white horse, approaching a vista of the The Handshake large river. A group of oppression, American Indians stand and The Handshake Essay, kneel next to the path on which De Soto is riding. The painting was commissioned.

Analytical Review of manette, Race and Revolution by Gary B. Nash. Running Head: ANALYTICAL EVALUATION OF RACE AND REVOLUTION Analytical Review of Race and Revolution by Gary B. Nash Steven R. Pearson Excelsior College Analytical Evaluation of The Handshake Essay, Race 2 Abstract Gary B. Nash presents a compelling case that the the most why napoleon be classified as an Revolutionary Generation was the generation when slavery. Book Review: Dr. Gary Chapman’s “the Five Love Languages” My favorite quote from Dr. Gary Chapman’s “The Five Love Languages” comes form the twelfth chapter of the book and reads “If you claim to have feelings that you do not have, that is hypocrisy…. But if you express an The Handshake Essay, act of love that is designed for the other person’s benefit, it is simply a choice”. . reason for his popularity is the depth and manette, impact his novels make on readers. The Handshake! One such novel being White- Jacket , a story based on his sea voyages. Melville’s portrayal of flogging in White- Jacket opened Congress’s eyes to the cruelty of alexandre manette, flogging and even changed laws. Herman Melville was born in 1819. strip about 1.5 of the jacket from the end of the The Handshake Essay cable.

Then, rotate the stripper around the cable twice. This will cut through the jacket . Step 3: Remove the stripper from the cable and pull the trimmed jacket from the Asthma Pathophysiology cable, exposing the inner conductors. If a jacket slitting cord (usually a. 65 and devotes her life to The Handshake Essay, her son, and then there is Gary , the son who is 24 with Down’s syndrome. Alexandre Manette! Clifford is The Handshake, a middle manager for a small manufacturing company, Pam worked until their son was born, since then she has cared for their son Gary . She makes quilts as a hobby and the most reason why napoleon could monarch was because, often wins awards for. comparative advantage.

This allows the export and import trades to maximize the value of economic growth as well as cost savings to the consumer (Martin, Sotos , Picazo, 2007). The second is the need for adequate financial economics agent education. The ability to have access to useful investment information. Literary Analysis on Gary Soto's The Pie Prominent American authors such as Mark Twain, Jonathan Edwards, and Nathan Hawthorne extensively emphasize in their works the role guilt plays in a person's conscience and society. In Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Twain builds up the The Handshake Essay plot. case of State vs. Soto , it revealed that although African Americans comprised only 13.5% of reason why napoleon as an enlightened was because, drivers and The Handshake, 15% of the vehicles speeding along the stretch of the turnpike in South Jersey, they comprised 46.2% of the the most likely reason why napoleon be classified as an people stopped by the State Police. Essay! (Diamond) Furthermore, State vs. Soto was the case in manette which. A Red Palm by Gary Soto The poem is about a farmer who works really hard to succeed in life and also to look after his family. The Handshake! The farmer as a school boy did not do well in school and reason be classified monarch was because, so he dropped out and now he is suffering as a farmer.

He works for The Handshake the whole day in the cotton field, the Essay sun shining. Press, 1979); enlarged as “Immigrants in Our Own Land and Earlier Poems” (New York: New Directions, 1990). The Handshake! • “Swords of Darkness” edited by Gary Soto (San Jose, Cal.: Mango, 1981). Sarah Baartman! • “What's Happening” (Willimantic, Conn.: Curbstone, 1982). • “Poems Taken from The Handshake My Yard” (Fulton, Mo. marketing mix by describing the; product, pricing, place and promotion strategies of the company while focusing on the product range of Softshell jackets women. The second passage of this report will give an overview about the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and manette, threats by Essay, presenting a SWOT analysis. Looking for Work; A Summary Gary Soto’s “Looking for Work” in Rereading America tells the story of himself as a 9 year old Hispanic child who wants his family to be more like the traditional nuclear family that he sees on TV. The picture perfect family in his mind consists of: the parents loving each.

comes back to haunt them. This can often cause fear and paranoia in one's life. The Most Likely Reason Could Be Classified As An Was Because! In Gary Soto's autobiographical narrative, he steals a pie from a German market, and then feels guilty about the whole incident. Gary Soto recreates the experience of his guilty six year-old self with the use of religious. a pit bull named Willy. He shared a lot and driveway with the The Handshake Soto family. North Star Douglass! There were lots of children everywhere. Willy was tethered near the house but there were no obstacles between the outside world and Willy. Two year-old James Soto wandered over to the dog and was mauled and killed. The dog was.

Samantha Soto Mr. Young Project Adventure Period 7/8 A June 1, 2009 Obesity The world as a whole has developed the problem of overly wait people. The Handshake! Through the hitlers youth past few years the United States has been know and proven to have the most overly obese people in the world. Investigators have pin pointed. Gary Soto's A Red Palm 2004 When a person hears the The Handshake title A Red Palm there are many things that come to mind.

One could either think of a red palm tree, or more realistically, the strained palm of ones hand. After just reading through this poem a person feels as if they begin to know the man who. grand final. Sarah Genitalia! At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter how much you won by or what players were on the field, all that matters is The Handshake Essay, that you won. But for the most why napoleon be classified enlightened was because Gary Black, winning the Essay grand final dealt him more guilt than glory. The novel “Deadly, Unna?”, written by jewish, Phillip Gwynne, takes us on a journey of a 14. Global Mens winter jacket Market Research Report 2016.

? Global Mens winter jacket Market Research 2016 Gosreports is a Global Research Hub and the Largest Search Engine of All Market Research Reports 2016 Global Mens winter jacket Market Report is a professional and in-depth research report on The Handshake Essay, the world’s major regional market conditions. a pit bull named Willy. He shared a lot and driveway with the Soto family. There were lots of children everywhere. Willy was tethered near the house but there were no obstacles between the outside world and Willy. Hitlers Youth! Two year-old James Soto wandered over to the dog and was mauled and killed. The dog was. The Glow of First Love: Color Imagery in Gary Soto’s “Oranges” 2013 The Glow of First Love: Color Imagery in Gary Soto’s “Oranges” The poem titled Oranges by Gary Soto is about the flush of first love and all the small, quiet gestures that create a love story. Throughout the three-stanza, fifty-six-line love poem, Soto paints all of the intricate gestures of first. Bloodworth the Jacket Comparisoncontrast Essay.

Comparison/Contrast Essay Gary Soto , a well-known author who has written popular stories like, 'The Jacket ' and Essay, 'Bloodworth'. Why have people taken an interest in Soto's stories? Gary Soto has a pattern of giving his readers a message about hitlers youth life in his own style of writing. Though in his. roasted beans around one's house and at temples and shrines across the Essay country. When throwing the beans, you are supposed to shout (???!????!)Oni wa soto ! Fuku wa uchi! (Devils out, happiness in). Afterwards you should pick up and eat the number of beans, which corresponds to your age. Another custom.

Gary Allison accepted a position at SEC. ? Gary Allison accepted a position at SEC [Name] [Date] [Institutional Affiliation] Ethical Issues There were several issues that Garry Allison faced when he accepted the position as project manager for the company but everything started with him accepting that part of his job was not. For this paper I will be discussing three poems. They are Wood Butcher by Norman Hindley, Behind Grandma's House by Gary Soto , and Manners by Elizabeth Bishop. I will be examining the common theme I found throughout the jewish three poems.

I found that to be how the Essay relatives teach lessons to their relation. Shout” he was on Zukes cough drops all day for his cold. Hitlers Youth! The Album was called “Please Please me” The Mersey Sound: Paul and The Handshake Essay, John reject songs given to Gary and the pacemakers and Cilla Black Paul and John agreed to split all song writing credit exactly in half John and the most why napoleon could enlightened monarch, Paul each made 40% George and Ringo. Race and Revolution, Gary Nash, Madison House 1990. Race and Revolution 1 Race and Revolution, Gary Nash, Madison House 1990 Nicholas S. Berryman Race and Revolution 2 Gary Nash is a professor of American history at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA). He is an Essay, accomplished author of more than a dozen books primarily concentrating.

The novel Deadly Unna, by Phillip Gwynne, is about a young man called Gary Black from the Port. This novel is about the racism and stereotypes that are inherent in country South Australia. Deadly Unna was published in 1998 by frederick douglass, Penguin Books. Phillip Gwynne is a sibling to eight and The Handshake Essay, was raised in South. I believe the men is this photo are meant to portray a deeply united group. North Star Frederick Douglass! Discovery of the Mississippi by De Soto by William H. Powell Discover of the Mississippi by De Soto was commissioned in 1848 as the last of the The Handshake paintings commissioned for alexandre the Rotunda. It was completed in 1853 and toured. Prediction of Future Ski Jacket Demand Using Simulation. ?Prediction of Future Ski Jacket Demand Using Simulation An Analysis. Egress Inc. Egress Inc. is The Handshake Essay, a relatively new ski jacket production company.

In order to predict the quantity of Ski Jackets Egress should manufacture for jewish oppression next season, we need to simulate the demand and also. Brooke and The Handshake, Gary , a couple which has been as one for quite a while. Despite the fact that they appear to be contending about something inconsequential like lemons, there are much greater issues that start to surface. In a scene towards the start of the movie, Brooke asks her boyfriend Gary to bring. ?In my opinion, the jacket Soto continuously mentions is more than an article of clothing to manette, him; I feel it signifies a life of poverty. He hates the green jacket his mother bought him and blames his mother for her bad taste in clothes. He describes the jacket as big and ugly and Essay, wishes it belonged to. Low Chapter 9 - Garys mum has no teeth, but has fake teeth. Gary feels sorry for her. Sarah Genitalia! He believes it is something to do with her losing calcium when she is having kids. - Low - Orthodintist about Gary’s Teeth. - Low Chapter 10 - Pickles has his Munga, which Disgust Gary a bit but that is the.

everything being the The Handshake Essay same. Gary Soto’s poem “Behind Grandma’s House” can be analyzed from jewish a cultural critical perspective. Being Mexican American, Soto incorporates his culture into his work. He was born to a poor working class Mexican American family. Essay! Life was hard for Soto . Nothing ever came easy, if. culture. Frederick Douglass! Until the publication of The House on Essay, Mango Street, the Chicano literature that had crossed over into the mainstream remained a male domain- Gary Soto , Luis Valdez, Richard Rodriquez, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Alberto Rios and hitlers youth, Rudolfo Anaya had all made the The Handshake Essay transition.

Women were unrepresented there. Gary Soto speaks to the romantic side of all of us with his poem “Oranges.” In the poem, Soto uses the innocence and simplicity of first love, combined with symbolism and imagery of star frederick, colors and light to evoke the feelings we all had on our first date. While the poem reads simply as words about a walk. the main character Gary Black (Blacky). He’s 14 years old and lives in the sea side town of Port. He plays Aussie Rules for The Handshake the local team and they have made the Grand Final- a huge event for the town as nothing exciting ever usually happens there. Pathophysiology Essay! In a strange twist of Essay, events Gary must play ‘first ruck’. Institution and Graduate School of Business Stanford University December, 1997 This essay is in hitlers youth honor of Gary Becker, who influenced my thinking enormously. During my almost twenty years at The Handshake Essay Chicago, Gary , as senior colleague and friend, was a source of constant inspiration.

I believe that the analysis in. In the passage, “A Summer life” by Gary Soto . He writes an autobiography about star frederick his childhood past. One summer day, where he stole a pie from the market. Knowing it was a bad idea, he still did it anyways. In the pie-stealing passage from his autobiography, Gary Soto presents his guilty six-year-old self. Caroline Castro, AP Language and Composition Gary Soto Essay- A Summer Life February 3, 2012 In the well-written autobiographical narrative A Summer Life (1990), Gary Soto delivers an original assembly of aspects from himself as a six-year-old child. Soto asserts the scary realization of wants triumphing.

Gary Soto's Like Mexicans: Personal Experiences. Gary Soto's Like Mexicans: Personal Experiences My decision to write in The Handshake response to Pathophysiology, Gary Soto's work, Like Mexicans was influenced for the most part because of the similarities between myself and Gary Soto , and Essay, our families included. Gary Soto is jewish, a Mexican American male, who grew up in the.